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Discussion Starter #1
After reading about the emergency blankets that are just s simple sheet of mylar, I'm wondering if anyone has found/invented a mylar glove that can be worn inside a regular mc riding glove? It would seem to me to be THE answer to non-powered glove inserts/liners that would keep your hands warm.

I've tried several times searching the Internet to find something simple, but the only thing I can find are welders' gloves that have mylar built into them or sewn onto the back. That's not what I want.

What I'm really wanting is something as simple as the disposable gloves that are used by the hundreds in fast-food restaurants & are packaged 100 to the box & fit either hand without worrying which glove you're putting on either hand.

If nobody knows of such a thing, I'll probably get out one of our old Daisy Seal-A-Meal machines & a couple of old mylar balloons and see if I can make something that will work.

I'm not talking about something that'll be used when riding all day long in sub-zero weather (not including the windchill at 60 mph), but something that'll keep the hands warm when riding to work on a day that's 40 degrees in the morning & 75 in the afternoon, or something similar.

I probably just gave away an excellent idea for a patent, but if someone here does do that, then you owe me a box of them! :lol:
 

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Mylar doesn't breathe. At all. You might as well put your hands in dishwashing gloves, because after a very short while, your hands will be soaking wet.

I made the serious mistake of putting a mylar "space blanket" over my sleeping bag during a winter camping trip with my son's Boy Scout troop. The moisture soaked the bag, and I was seriously cold the entire night.
 

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I tried wearing rubber medical gloves to see if they'd make my hands a tad warmer. They made my hands sweatier, but didn't feel too much warmer....
 

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While they wouldn't look 'cool' on a cruiser style bike the handguards we had on the V-Stroms we rented in NZ were amazingly effective.

The weather there was dicey at best cool and sometimes rainy. We were riding all day occassionally in weather in the 40-50 ranges and the hands never got too cold. Our gloves are nothing special either- insulated picked up at some discount online leather shop for <$30.

Just keeping the air off the gloves works well, maybe mylar on the outside of your riding glove would get you to work in comfort.....albeit slightly clownish......

:wink:
 

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jbsiii said:
Mylar doesn't breathe. At all. You might as well put your hands in dishwashing gloves, because after a very short while, your hands will be soaking wet.
That was my thought.
 

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For 40ish degree riding I wear a second pair of 2 for 99cent cloth gloves from the the thrift store beneath my Mechanix gloves.

Hands get chilled but not painfully cold.

you can ad latex gloves too so that you are wearing cloth-latex-mechanix in that layer and your hands will be "warm" into the 30's

of course "warm" is a relative term. still cold but not painfully so.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My poor fingers have always gotten cold very quickly, especially when not being flexed on a continuous basis. Even so, while working in my cube, if the temp gets below 72, my fingers still get very cold & stiff, causing lots of mistakes. I'm aware that mylar does not breathe. The gloves I have are so tight (& they're the XLg size) that wearing the wool liners I bought makes it almost impossible for me to curl my hands around the grips, and they still get cold because they're not blocking the wind. I really don't mind sweaty hands after an 8 mile trip to work or back, they will dry off very quickly with the towel I keep in the tour trunk. Might even help keep them moisturized so that they don't crack from being constantly too dry. But, that's not the point. I just want something that will block the wind, slide in & out of the glove easily, & be thin enough to not overstuff my padded leather riding gloves.

Yes, I'm looking at the National Cycle PlexiFairing III which does extend out over the grips. But, that solution is definitely more expensive & replacing a perfectly good shield just isn't in the budget at the moment. Of course, in another 2 weeks it'll be summer again (3 seasons here in South Texas: Almost Summer, Summer, & Not Quite Still Summer), it'll be a moot point!
 

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David said:
I really don't mind sweaty hands after an 8 mile trip to work or back, they will dry off very quickly with the towel I keep in the tour trunk. Might even help keep them moisturized so that they don't crack from being constantly too dry. But, that's not the point. I just want something that will block the wind, slide in & out of the glove easily, & be thin enough to not overstuff my padded leather riding gloves.
David,

You'll probably find that your hands will dry out more when they sweat like that.
That sweat is the moisture in your skin. When you sweat, it comes out...
Then when you dry it off with a towel, you've removed that moisture.

It would be an exaggerated scenerio of going out in to the wind and sweating.
You'd sweat a little, but the wind would dry out the moisture as it blows across... leaving your skin to dry.
 

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The only time you want to use a vapor barrier like this is in extreme cold, like 20 below, (no kidding). It works well then, but not many of us will be riding at 20 below zero.

Using that mylar over your sleeping bag at -20 won't soak the bag and will make you warmer, but you will wake up with a thin layer of ice on the outside of you bag. 8)

You want a glove layer system, thin poly pro liner gloves, and then thicker over gloves or mittens and maybe even an outer shell. You can then wear whichever by themselves when warmer, or all when colder. That way you got all the bases covered, cold, warm, warmer.
 

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Hey David,

Have you tried any "Air Deflectors"? They run them on dirt bikes all the time, you pick u p clears to fit your cruiser.

Just a thought
 

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I bought a set of liners at a local motorcycle shop that are very thin and have reflective metal threads woven into them. They trap natural body heat and reflect it back. Seem to work pretty well in cold riding conditions. As I remember, they were about 8 or 10 dollars. The only negative is that they look like something Micheal Jackson may have lost.
 

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David,

Maybe the easiest, best solution for your cold hands and size problem is to use "ski mittens"(nylon outer cover/thinsulate, leather types are colder) with an inner liner of cotton glove. I know, I know....MITTENS.....yes, mittens. The object of mittens is to retain "more" body heat to the hand/fingers while still giving flexibility.

I have such mittens for cold weather (electrics for very cold weather temps) and yes, it does take some getting used to to operate the levers. BUT, it's a better solution than finger gloves that separate the fingers and the result is loss of body heat. BUT, if your smart, you can add some chemical hand warmers and really have some good heat for about 4 hours.

Many may laugh but; the ugly and useful sure is warmer than pretty and uselessly cold. :roll:

Bullzeyet
 

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The only way to prevent cold fingers is heated grips or grip heaters. For $24 and about 1/2 hour, you won't regret them. I have the ones they make for snomobiles on both of my bikes and love them. I now wear thin gloves and have better control then wearing those big bulky gaunlet glove I've used for years. Just a thought.
 

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I agree with the heated grips.... I have a cheap $20 pair of leather thinsulate gloves and have ridden at 19 degrees for my 30 mile commute. It takes them a few miles to get heated up good, but they definitely work great!! At 19 my hands were cold, but not frozen and knumb. At about 35 degrees, they are perfect!!! I switch them to low when it's about 45 or above outside... I can even ride without gloves when its in the mid 50's.... Not a perfect solution, but for the price, it's pretty darn close!
 

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The day I bought my bike I bought a pair of plain black leather gloves with the short gauntlets. Later, when the weather started turning colder I bought a pair of Thinsulate insulated gloves. The plain leather ones were actually warmer. I have ridden in temps in the upper 20s and the leather gloves are fine. My face and neck freeze way before my hands get uncomfortable. My 3/4 helmet with shield 'leaks' right at the temple areas and I get a headache from the jets of cold air....but my hands are not cold.
 

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David said:
The gloves I have are so tight (& they're the XLg size) that wearing the wool liners I bought makes it almost impossible for me to curl my hands around the grips, and they still get cold because they're not blocking the wind.

Any clothing that is tight is a poor insulator and will cause you to get cold more easily. Insulation is created by tiny pockets of air trapped in the garment that are warmed by body heat. The heat is then retained between you and the elements, and helps you stay warmer. When you wear tight clothing, the insulation is compressed, the tiny air pockets disappear, and the garment conducts heat away from your body to its outer layer where it is dispersed into the air. For this reason, the same garment in a size too small will make you feel much colder than one that is a size too big. Try some well insulated leather gloves that are slightly loose-fitting.
 
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