Honda Shadow Forums banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

Registered
Joined
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A little back story here...

I recently purchased a '98 ACE Deluxe 750 from a friend (despite my better judgement). I got the thing home and removed the saddle bags to find the top bolt for the left rear shock had sheared at the head. In doing some research, it appears as though the mounting stud (in which the bolt threads) is apparently compression welded to the frame.

I found one other thread that addresses this issue, but there was never a conclusion or definitive course of action regarding repair. Has anyone else had this problem? And if so, what did you do to fix it? Until I can get the thing resolved, I'm saddled with a giant paperweight.

Thanks!

For your reference: https://www.hondashadow.net/threads/broken-rear-shock-mounting-bolt.499642/
 

Registered
Joined
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I appreciate the input. Obviously, structural integrity is of foremost importance to me, but I'd also like it to look like a factory job, utilizing a chromed bolt as the other side does. Of course, I realize this complicates things greatly.
 

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
if I were to fix it myself I would drill out the old stud, run a bolt through the frame and weld it on both sides of the tubing. Just my two cents
A weld isn't absolutely necessary if Libertate can transplant the right side stud (5) on the left side (graphic below). I don't know if flange nut 7 is the nut for stud 5 as the thread specs isn't stated on the oem parts page. But a replacement is easy to find. Stud 5 might even screw into internal threads on the frame. Bushing 2 fits both left and right upper shocks, so stud 5 must have the same diameter, left or right, OD and ID. The lateral position might not match up on the left (?).


I'd also like it to look like a factory job, utilizing a chromed bolt as the other side does. Of course, I realize this complicates things greatly.
If you're able to transplant bolt 5, the deluxe version of washer 8 and bolt 6 are probably chrome.
Libertate, are you able to post a pic of the broken stud?

283472

283468



283470
 

Registered
Joined
41 Posts
There's something wrong with that drawing. why does it show the steering stem nut instead of the left mount?

Is the large part the rubber bushing slides over still there? just the retaining bolt and washer broken off? If so, I'd drill it and try an EZ out. if that fails I'd helicoil it. No real strain on the retaining bolt, just has to keep the shock from sliding off. long as lower bolt is there, shouldn't move..

If it's the whole mount broken off, thats a different story. I'd try to fit one from the right side myself. Might check a shop manual, see what they say.
 

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
There's something wrong with that drawing. why does it show the steering stem nut instead of the left mount?

I haven't a clue why nut 7 is labelled as 'steering stem nut' on the oem parts page. It look like a bigger diameter too than stud 5. But as said above, stud 5 might screw into internal threads in the frame. It still might require a nut. Like how the clutch lever bolt on the left handlebar has a nut on the bottom.

If the threaded part of stud 5 is long enough to protrude out of the frame, a nut would work. If stud 5 is not long enough, it's a lot more work. You'd have to thread the left frame. That would require drilling out the left bolt with precision. Or, spot welding stud 5 to the left frame.

283479
 

Registered
Joined
12,020 Posts
I just happened to click on 1100 ACE and saw the rear shocks bolts are both the same. So here is a heavier bike with replaceable bolts on both sides. Strange !
I would drill out and tap the broken stud hole, and get the factory bolt, and put it together.
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
I think it goes like this, the 1100's have them on both sides while the 750's have a single bolt on the right side. There's probably a reason that it's done that way, though. You only need the bolt because it has the proper diameter. Don't know if the 1100 bolt is the same diameter as the 750's. As we speak, ebay has 1100 bolts for a dollar.

283482
 

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
I don't know if this pic solves the mystery of the nut labeled as the 'steering stem nut' on the oem parts page, but it might. I don't see how nut 7 would fit on the bolt 5 on the oem page as it does on the bolt in the photo.

283484


283483
 

Registered
Joined
12,020 Posts
When I first saw that bolt/stud in the picture you captured I wondered why it looked like it has large threads. Now it makes more sense about the nut. But again, why even have the nut???
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks to all of you who have responded. I'm sorry I haven't followed up-- it's been a bit of a crazy week.

Fortunately, the stud/bolt (five in the diagram) is still intact... it's bolt six that has sheared at the head. With the help of my amateur engineer of a father, we created a tool that would allow us to drill out that bolt and minimize wandering of the bit. We used a spark plug socket that fit snugly around the stud, drilled out the center of a bolt and put it through the socket's squared end, and put a nut inside to secure it. A picture's worth a thousand words, so I've included a photo for reference. It actually required a carbide-tipped bit to make any headway. We were able to drill it out sufficiently enough to get an easy out in there, but I was applying so much force that I feared we were going to break it, at which point we'd be up a creek without a paddle! We may end up simply going the helicoil route.

I believe the purpose of the large nut (seven) is to retain the grab rail/fender mount.
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
41 Posts
I've had 2 750 Aces for the last 11 years and somehow never noticed the shock mounts being different. And I've even changed to Progressive shocks on both. (Or more likely just cant remember s&$%)
 

Registered
Joined
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I don't think the differences are readily apparent. One is simply compression welded into the frame, whereas the other threads into it.
 

Registered
Joined
12,020 Posts
Not sure about compression welding but I have heard of Friction Welding many times. It can join dissimilar metals . That's how engine valves are made with different metal for the stem and the head.
A lot of cool videos of the process.



 

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
Libertate is simply using a term that he read on a thread that he referenced. I don't know about you, but 'for some reason,' I thought the damaged bolt was Bolt 5 instead of Bolt 6. Huge difference. Now, why would I think that? On the internet at that.

283541


I never bothered to scroll through the entire thread that Libertate referenced in the original post. Perhaps, you did too. I mention this because randylgrep posted pics of the left shock bolt, here. Below, some relevant pics stitched together.

283543


283544
 

Registered
Joined
12,020 Posts
I get it now too. If it was #5 it needs to be very strong to take the load and pounding. But # 6, Hells Bells drill it out and get a bolt in there and ride. All it does is keep the shock bushing in place on the mount.
 

Registered
Joined
3,724 Posts
Yea, huge difference as far as repairing it. Somebody stripped it previously. It would take a huge jolt to knock it off the larger bolt. Sideways, I mean.
 

Registered
Joined
8,042 Posts
Had this happen on the Valk and once I removed the broken M8 (#6), I replaced it with stainless hardware and using antisieze on the threads.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top