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Oddly, looked in the manual and I can't find the spark plug torque setting for the VT500C. Anyone know ?

Thanks
 

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Oddly, looked in the manual and I can't find the spark plug torque setting for the VT500C. Anyone know ?

Thanks
Wow this topic came just in time, I was looking everything for the exact same values since my VT600CD service manual only gives information fo the plugs type and the gap size. After a long research I found that after you have tight them down by hand and collapse the gasket you should adjust to 10 to 12 ft. pound torque. I adjusted mine to exactly 10 ft. pound.

Hope it helps. and remember to use anti-seize grease

Cheers!
 

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Thanks, for the information. Anti-seize grease on spark plugs? Never thought of that since they're changed out so regularly.
 

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Thanks. Do you use an anti-seize specific to Spark Plugs or just any anti-seize? At the local Hardware store they have 2 types. "Bronze" and "Silver". The Silver one lists spark plugs as an application.
 

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As long as you don't go over 10 ft lbs you shouldn't need anything more than the usual thin coat of vasaline on the thread..

Many people don't realise how light 10 ft lbs is so they overtighten the plug.

John.
 

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Wow this topic came just in time, I was looking everything for the exact same values since my VT600CD service manual only gives information fo the plugs type and the gap size. After a long research I found that after you have tight them down by hand and collapse the gasket you should adjust to 10 to 12 ft. pound torque. I adjusted mine to exactly 10 ft. pound.

Hope it helps. and remember to use anti-seize grease

Cheers!
I am installing a set of NGK Iridium plugs in my VF1100C. I have been reading to NOT use any anti-seize grease. Also. directions on my torque wrench state that plugs should be installed "with clean and dry threads" to prevent inaccurate readings.
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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I have taken hundreds of plugs in and out of cars for years and never used anti-seize. But it would be a good idea to use it on plugs that are designed to be replaced at 100,000 miles. But we don't deal with that on our bikes.
 
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2007 VT750DC Spirit “chopper”
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Never use any compound on plug threads. They rely on the extensively good metal to metal connection for ground.
 
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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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Never use any compound on plug threads. They rely on the extensively good metal to metal connection for ground.
Also for heat transfer, you can guess what the primary path is. (-:

This is from NGK
Spark Plug Basics
The spark plug has two primary functions:
  • To ignite the air/fuel mixture
  • To remove heat from the combustion chamber
Actually all the info there is a pretty good read:
 

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Good ole NGK, never a let down.
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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Good information.
Here is an interesting thought too while we are talking about torque.
On taper seat spark plugs( Ford?), the amount of torque can affect the heat range. If it is too loose it will not transfer heat from the plug body into the head as well as it is designed to.
 

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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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Ford had the big 18mm tapered seat plugs seemingly forever, at least from the '50's.

Chevy went to tapered plug seat on the small blocks around 1970-71
On the small block Chevy tapered plugs I used to use BITD, they were 5/8" wrench 14mm and they typically came with no washer and yes they had to be tight enough, but not too tight.
Then for race applications when you added in the mix of large headers, port plates, angled plugs and the need to index the plug ground electrode positioning with selected thickness copper washers, things became frustrating fast.
Using a torque wrench on some of those would be a dream at best, that is why an experienced crew is invaluable.
 

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1995 VT1100C2
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All the spark plug manufacturers added an antiseize (trivalent) compound to the thread a long time ago. The problem was adding an additional anti seize threw off torque setting so caused over torquing. NGK specially warns to use no anti seize compound.
 
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