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AHEAD!!!!!!

I have a cloudy lense on my odometer and can pick up a used one with 15,000 less miles than my bike.

I would like to buy it and spin it with a drill to my existing mileage.

Possible>>>?????[/b]
 

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tropicalsuns said:
AHEAD!!!!!!

I have a cloudy lense on my odometer and can pick up a used one with 15,000 less miles than my bike.

I would like to buy it and spin it with a drill to my existing mileage.

Possible>>>?????[/b]
tropicalsuns,

I have never reset an odometer, but I knew an oldtimer who was Sergent of the Motorpool in WWII and he told me stories about doing it. According to him a high speed drill could turn the odometer back in a short time.

There are however a couple things to remember.

One....this is only hearsay.

Two...There was at least one major difference, the old time odometers had metal gears. The new ones are plastic. I doubt that the plastic would be able to standup to a high speed drill.

Just doing the math.....and I may be miles off with this!

At 60 miles per hour...the ones digit moves at ONE RPM.

You want to change yours 15000 revolutions, in a fairly short period of time. (the time is adjustable by you however, if you have variable speed drill)

If you brought your speed up to 600 MPH , that still leaves 1500 minutes.

That's more than a one full day at ten times it's normal design. I don't know if they can stand it or not.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #3
John,

I started in the car business back in '73 and they still spun at that time....but alas I did not "do the math"

A mile is ROUGHLY 5300 ft.

Even if my front tire was a 24" wheel it would have to spin 2650 times in revolution to put on a mile on the odometer.

If my drill stayed at a steady 650 rpm's it would take about 4 minutes for a mile. 15000 miles would take 60000 minutes or 1000 hours or almost 42 days of 24 hours a day spinning....

Maybe I should just figure out how to change the lense from the other one....
 

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I have a similar problem. Mine is not really cloudy, but has what appear
to be a couple of smudges on the inside of the glass. Does anyone know
if the unit can be dissassembled to clean the glass inside? Sorry, I didn't
mean to hi-jack the thread.
 

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navillustoo said:
Try using a die grinder. If you need tips on how to do it, ask Big Al! LMAO!
Heck, Al may even be able to provide the name of a Most Underhanded Dealer to assist you...... :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I think there is some fuzzy math going on above, here is the way I see it:

wheel diameter = 24"
* Pi(3.14)circ = 75.36"
Divided by 12 = 6.28' of tarmac covered per revoloution
5280/6.28 = 841 revolutions per mile of the wheel
15000*841 = 12,615,000 turns of the wheel to go back to zero
Using a 5000 rpm die grinder = 2523 minutes = 105 hours, provided one turn of the wheel equals one turn of the speedo cable, however the cable is probably less rpms since it is run through a gear set (just not sure it is a one to one ratio)

Keep in mind at 60mph the revolutions are 841 rpm for the wheel.
 

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cbjr0256 said:
I think there is some fuzzy math going on above, here is the way I see it:

wheel diameter = 24"
* Pi(3.14)circ = 75.36"
Divided by 12 = 6.28' of tarmac covered per revoloution
5280/6.28 = 841 revolutions per mile of the wheel
15000*841 = 12,615,000 turns of the wheel to go back to zero
Using a 5000 rpm die grinder = 2523 minutes = 105 hours, provided one turn of the wheel equals one turn of the speedo cable, however the cable is probably less rpms since it is run through a gear set (just not sure it is a one to one ratio)

Keep in mind at 60mph the revolutions are 841 rpm for the wheel.
cbjr0256,

I'm more woried about the actual odometer mechanism being able to withstand a situation that is 10 times what it was designed to operate for an extended period of time. or in a case of a die grinder it could be hundreds of times, depending on the gear ratio of the wheel mechanism..

I've pushed engines past their 'redline' and they've stood it. But doing that on a continuous basis is another game altogether.

A simple hook-up to a die grinder and let 'er whirl will solve it, but I was thinking he didn't want to ruin a speedometer if it wouldn't work.
 

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Olivereaman said:
cbjr0256 said:
I think there is some fuzzy math going on above, here is the way I see it:

wheel diameter = 24"
* Pi(3.14)circ = 75.36"
Divided by 12 = 6.28' of tarmac covered per revoloution
5280/6.28 = 841 revolutions per mile of the wheel
15000*841 = 12,615,000 turns of the wheel to go back to zero
Using a 5000 rpm die grinder = 2523 minutes = 105 hours, provided one turn of the wheel equals one turn of the speedo cable, however the cable is probably less rpms since it is run through a gear set (just not sure it is a one to one ratio)

Keep in mind at 60mph the revolutions are 841 rpm for the wheel.
cbjr0256,

I'm more woried about the actual odometer mechanism being able to withstand a situation that is 10 times what it was designed to operate for an extended period of time. or in a case of a die grinder it could be hundreds of times, depending on the gear ratio of the wheel mechanism..

I've pushed engines past their 'redline' and they've stood it. But doing that on a continuous basis is another game altogether.

A simple hook-up to a die grinder and let 'er whirl will solve it, but I was thinking he didn't want to ruin a speedometer if it wouldn't work.
Absolutely Agree, very high speed (in reverse) could be a problem......however it could be tested on the original/fogged-up speedo first....... :wink:
 

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You could take photos of both speedos side-by-side, then document the swap and the reasons, and have it notarized. Then if you ever sell the bike, you have a plausible explanation for the difference in actual vs. displayed mileage.

Of course, the person who sells it after you do may not have the same conscience, but 15,000 miles won't likely affect the resale value much. It is a Honda, after all!

CB
 

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The speedo cable makes one turn with each turn of the wheel, so I don't see why you couldn't just put the cable in a chuck and get it going but isn't there a way to just swap out the lense instead?
 

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downinit25i said:
The speedo cable makes one turn with each turn of the wheel, so I don't see why you couldn't just put the cable in a chuck and get it going but isn't there a way to just swap out the lense instead?
downinit25i,

First, let me confess that I don't have a lot of odometer experience. I have a lot of experience with distance measuring devices which are somewhat different in that they use electronics to work, so please bear with me if I'm 'out in left field' on this.

I am thinkng, and it's pure speculation, that Honda probably only made one or two models of mechanical speedometers, with some type of standard such as 500 revolutions /mile or 1000/mile instead of a different speedometer for each different tire size, and then used a set of gears that were calibrated to give the correct revolutions per mile for each different tire size.

Just thinking out loud and hoping someone will either confirm or correct my assumptions.

I also agree that there must be a way to swap lenses because I've seen places that will make a custom speedo face for you, and they or you would have to open it to install it.

John
 

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The speedometer DOES NOT make one revolution per revolution of the wheel. There is a worm gear assembly in there, and each bike manufacturer calculates the size of the wheel when they design the gear ratios that connect the speedometer. Luckily for us, almost all Japanese bikes are set for a standard number of speedometer cable revolutions for a given speed. This means that if you can get the cables to fit, a Suzuki speedo will fit (and be equally accurate) on a Honda or a Kawasaki. If I remember correctly, the standard speedometer calibration used is 2200 RPM for 60MPH. This means that the speedometer cable turns at 2200 RPM to register 60MPH on the dial.

So, since 60MPH translates into 1 mile per minute, you would need to spin that cable at 2200 RPM for 15,000 minutes (10.42 days) to gain 15,000 miles on the odometer. 4400 RPM (120 MPH registered) for 5.21 days, and since most speedometers aren't rated for past 120 MPH it would be pointless to continue the calculation. If you do exceed the rating for the speedometer, you risk deforming the hair spring inside the meter, and the meter will never be accurate again. (If you thought the speedo was inaccurate now...!)

But even if you could connect the speedo up to a 35,000 RPM Dremel motor, you would still have to spin it for almost 16 hours at a calibrated speed of roughly 950 miles per hour, which would completely destroy the speedometer. Not to mention a Dremel isn't rated for continuous duty at 35,000 RPM.

But, all things considered, if you got yourself an AC synchronous motor (pull one out of a cheap non-variable-speed Wal-Mart desk fan!) you'll have a low-power 3600 RPM motor that would treat your new speedometer with adequate care, and add 15,000 miles to the clock in just under 7 days, registering 98 miles per hour, which is acceptable. So yes, it can be done. It's just a mater of how long you want to wait.

Hope this helps!

--Justin
 

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I've taken my speedo apart to clean the lens, not that hard really.

The whole guts comes out and you have the metal shell with the glass lens in.
 

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Is there a gear in the housing that connects the front wheel to the speedo cable then? I remember having it off and seeing how it just connected to the wheel and couldn't remember there being much of a difference between twisting the wheel connection and watching the cable connection turn. I'll admit I didn't watch close and you sound right.
 

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I have no personal experience with this, but have read that the underside of the speedometer lens is coated with an oil that keeps it from fogging. You aren't supposed to touch them. If you do clean it, it may start fogging.

Found this info on one of the sites that sells custom speedometer dials.

Scott
 

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tubes_rock said:
The speedometer DOES NOT make one revolution per revolution of the wheel. There is a worm gear assembly in there, and each bike manufacturer calculates the size of the wheel when they design the gear ratios that connect the speedometer. Luckily for us, almost all Japanese bikes are set for a standard number of speedometer cable revolutions for a given speed. This means that if you can get the cables to fit, a Suzuki speedo will fit (and be equally accurate) on a Honda or a Kawasaki. If I remember correctly, the standard speedometer calibration used is 2200 RPM for 60MPH. This means that the speedometer cable turns at 2200 RPM to register 60MPH on the dial.

So, since 60MPH translates into 1 mile per minute, you would need to spin that cable at 2200 RPM for 15,000 minutes (10.42 days) to gain 15,000 miles on the odometer. 4400 RPM (120 MPH registered) for 5.21 days, and since most speedometers aren't rated for past 120 MPH it would be pointless to continue the calculation. If you do exceed the rating for the speedometer, you risk deforming the hair spring inside the meter, and the meter will never be accurate again. (If you thought the speedo was inaccurate now...!)

But even if you could connect the speedo up to a 35,000 RPM Dremel motor, you would still have to spin it for almost 16 hours at a calibrated speed of roughly 950 miles per hour, which would completely destroy the speedometer. Not to mention a Dremel isn't rated for continuous duty at 35,000 RPM.

But, all things considered, if you got yourself an AC synchronous motor (pull one out of a cheap non-variable-speed Wal-Mart desk fan!) you'll have a low-power 3600 RPM motor that would treat your new speedometer with adequate care, and add 15,000 miles to the clock in just under 7 days, registering 98 miles per hour, which is acceptable. So yes, it can be done. It's just a mater of how long you want to wait.

Hope this helps!

--Justin
tubes_rock,

I know very little about speedometers in general and almost nothing about Japanese spedometers.

My father used to disconnect the cable to his speedometer to 'keep the miles' off his pick-up. I remember once being very curious about how fast the the cable had to spin to make the speedometer work. So one day when he wasn't around I got up under the dash and spun the speedometer unit by hand while my brother watched.

Well, it turned into a game of who could make the truck go the fastest. Spinning the speedometer by hand, we were able to make it register over 100MPH. It took a pretty good twist to get there, but it wasn't really that hard.

I tell this story because it didn't seem like we spinning anyplace close to 2200 RPM. Also, it was many years ago, but I think we clocked about 8-9 miles playing with it.

You've got my interest up about the rpm's though.

The new electrical dodads have a 'standard' of one pulse per foot. However, I've seen a bunch of these things runnng anywhere from 400 pulses/thousand feet to over 15,000/thousand feet.

John
 

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spoupard said:
I have no personal experience with this, but have read that the underside of the speedometer lens is coated with an oil that keeps it from fogging. You aren't supposed to touch them. If you do clean it, it may start fogging.

Found this info on one of the sites that sells custom speedometer dials.

Scott
,
spoupard,

I remember reading that also, now that you mention it. I think I remember something about having the oil replentished if it became contaminated of removed.


Good call!!

John
 

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A few years back, I was interested in purchasing a combo speedometer and tach for my harley. I remember reading that the dealer will reset your speedometer mileage to the present mileage. I never did it, so I don't know exactly what they would of, or how they would have done it, so I can't help you with that. But the first thing I would have done in your case, before anything else, was contact the dealer and/or the secretary of state and find out what the LEGAL process would have been in doing such a swap. If I was you, I'd still call them, play dumb and tell them you need to replace the odometer... yada, yada, yada, and if there is such a legal process, I'd even consider putting the old odometer back on and taking it from there.
 
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