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Discussion Starter #1
Hey folks, two questions on one thread here:
First, how do I check my spokes to be sure they are tight enough, and when I find a loose one how do I know how much to tighten it?
Second, does anyone have experience with HID lighting? I've read good things about it (a 35-watt HID bulb is 3x as bright as a 55 watt halogen, lasts 10,000 hours) and bad (illegal in many places, no low beam.)
thanks!
Scott
 

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dunno bout them spokes i have mags

do more research on the tungsten arc lighting you'll find that you have some misinformation.

the best conversion out there is a complete reflector lens lamp upgrade the reason being is that the arc bulbs that will fit your bike have the light source in the wrong place for your current reflector/lens combo. thus you'll not receive all of the benefits.

remember that you need to keep the aiming of your headlight in check regardless of what kind of light you use otherwise you run the risk of blinding oncoming traffic and creating a situation of not enough light at night for you to see with
 

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silvershadow55 said:
Hey folks, two questions on one thread here:
First, how do I check my spokes to be sure they are tight enough, and when I find a loose one how do I know how much to tighten it?
Second, does anyone have experience with HID lighting? I've read good things about it (a 35-watt HID bulb is 3x as bright as a 55 watt halogen, lasts 10,000 hours) and bad (illegal in many places, no low beam.)
thanks!
Scott
silvershadow55,

Since nobody else jumped in about the spokes I'll take a stab at it.

I really don't know if this is correct or not, but it is the way I was taught by old time mechanics over 40 years ago.

First thing...you have to be able to spin the wheels freely. Back in the day motorcycles had center stands for just that purpose, today.... well you'll have to improvise. You'll need a screwdriver, not too large but also not too small. One about 10 inches long should work ok. Once the wheel is off the ground get it spinning with a a fairly decent speed. Take the screwdriver and lay it on a part of the bike that will allow you to keep it steady and just touch the side of the wheel. This will show you if the wheel is running true. If it isn't true you'll have to adjust it by tightening and loosening spokes. After getting the wheel to run true, you must adjust all the spokes. Take the screwdriver in your hand and hold it loosely at an angle and just touch the spokes gently with it while it's spinning. The spokes will make a tune as they contact the screwdriver. If all spokes are at the same tightness, the tune will be even. Any spoke that is loose will not twang but rather it will produce a duller sound. The looser it is, the duller the sound. As the wheel slows down you can visually identify any spokes that need to be adjusted. I used to use a small adjustable wrench to bring them back tight. After doing this, check the wheel for running true once again and make any adjustments to get it true. It really isn't a terribly difficult procedure.

When you're finished the wheel should run true and all spokes are at the same tension.


Cleaning and adjusting wheels are the best reason I can think of for cast wheels!

John
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, I've decided that a HID lighting system is a bad idea ( for me) because they cannot be used with a modulator
 

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silvershadow55 said:
Ok, I've decided that a HID lighting system is a bad idea ( for me) because they cannot be used with a modulator
I have the Sylvania Silver Star 55 watt bulb in my headlight (about $19.00). It makes a big difference, is legal in all 50 states (don't know about Canada), and works well with my Back Off (Signal Dynamics) headlight modulator.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just FYI: I found this on the NHTSA wedsite regarding HID conversions:

Another disturbing trend in this look-a-like phenomenon is the substitution of OEM filament headlamp bulbs with aftermarket HID conversion bulbs. The desire is to achieve the look and achieve the more robust performance of HIDs. While not designed to be interchangeable, some aftermarket companies are substantially altering the HID bulb bases or providing adapters so that the HID bulbs can be inserted in headlamps designed for filament bulbs. The consequence of making these substitutions is to adversely affect safety. Filament headlamps are optically designed for the volume of light and filament placement and other critical dimensions and performance that OEM filament bulbs have. The HID conversions result in two to three times the volume of light and potentially imprecise arc placement. Such conversions often result in beam patterns that behave nothing like the original filament beam pattern, cannot be reliably aimed, and have many times the permitted glare intensity. In informal conversations with persons who have tested such conversions, the light intensity on one at a point aimed toward oncoming drivers was 22 times the allowable intensity limit. Another lamp was more than 7 times too intense. With poor HID bulb and arc placement, the glare intensity could be significantly worse. Thus, the use of these conversions could be yet another source of the glare problems about which many drivers have complained.
 
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