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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was so discouraged with my ride today.

I drove around town getting used to my bike I picked up last night. I rode a long time ago, but am new to it now.

I decided to go down to my mom's. She's about 20 minutes away. The last 8 minutes, they had rain down there. I was nervous riding in the light rain and the wet roads, some with little streams in the road. I didn't have any issues.

Rode back home, never rained up here. I live at the top of a steep hill. I normally take the road that has no stops, but that road was closed, so I had to come up a pretty good hill and stop at the top. I dropped it (slowly), trying to start on the hill.

Felt really stupid and flustered. Luckily, a guy from the apartments was outside and helped me get it back up and push it to a more level spot. No damage to me or the bike (slightly sore in my lower back)

Didn't tell the Mr.

Suggestions for hills? I've read to practice flat and gradual hills by keeping your right foot on the brake and clutching, throttle and releasing the foot brake is a good way to do it.
 

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sorry about what happened.

all i can add to this is make sure you are in 1st gear.

I thought I was in 1st but I wasn't, and when I checked it....yeah I was in 2nd gear. Ever since then, my nickname became 2ndGear!!! LOL
 

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Typically, I'll keep both feet on the ground in a situation like this. Use one or two fingers to hold the front brake and twist the throttle at the same time letting out the clutch. Reason being, if you stall it, like you did, it's likely going to throw you off balance resulting in a high probability of dropping the bike. This is a technique you should practice and master so the next time it won't happen.

Sorry to hear it happened, hopefully you didn't damage the bike. Glad to hear you're ok for the most part.
 

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Pull to the stop, pull the clutch and front brake to hold the bike. Make sure you are in first. Foot on rear brake to hold bike, let go of front brake. When ready to go get into the friction zone. Slowly let the rear brake off until you are moving. Off you go.

Watch this
 

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I use the rear brake myself. I rarely put my right foot down when stopped so it is not much of an adjustment for me to use the rear brake. I have short legs (30" inseam), the left foot only down is a leftover habit from riding taller bikes where I could only get one foot down and needed to slide off the seat on that side a bit to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Typically, I'll keep both feet on the ground in a situation like this. Use one or two fingers to hold the front brake and twist the throttle at the same time letting out the clutch. Reason being, if you stall it, like you did, it's likely going to throw you off balance resulting in a high probability of dropping the bike. This is a technique you should practice and master so the next time it won't happen.

Sorry to hear it happened, hopefully you didn't damage the bike. Glad to hear you're ok for the most part.

It happened so fast, I don't even know how I did it. My first thoughts after getting home was that I have no business riding if I screwed that up. But I've been reading and I think I need to practice, practice, practice.
 

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+1 to all the replies. Use that friction zone... it won't burn out your clutch, like with a car. Our clutches are oil operated. At first on hills, I liked having both feet on the ground, it felt more stable. But that meant coordinating my right hand between throttle and front brake, which isn't tough if it's what you're expecting to do. Hey, don't feel bad... there's worse places or ways to drop a bike, like not knowing the side stand is up and moving it forward, in front of a busy restaurant and people waiting at the gas station, then letting it go. Down it goes, and further down goes the ego!! Good luck!!! It's pretty easy, give it a go a couple times... no more dropped bike :)
 

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It happened so fast, I don't even know how I did it. My first thoughts after getting home was that I have no business riding if I screwed that up. But I've been reading and I think I need to practice, practice, practice.
Don't give up so fast, it's a learning experience, use it as such. Keep on riding and def practice things in areas that you feel lacking in. You'll be fine.
 

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My boss got me into riding and told me (the day I couldn't make a corner, slid on the iceplant, and dropped my bike on my foot) that there are two kinds of riders, those that have gone down and those that are going to go down. I just hope he meant once!

My first thoughts after getting home was that I have no business riding if I screwed that up.
I have had to battle that same thought more than once. I use all my failures as learning tools rather than get discouraged by them. That day I dropped the bike on my foot was probably the single best thing that has happened for my riding. It was embarrassing (I did it in front of a crowd of experienced riders naturally) but that single event got me more determined than ever and I am a better rider because of it.

Analyse and apply what you have learned.
 

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sorry about what happened.

all i can add to this is make sure you are in 1st gear.

I thought I was in 1st but I wasn't, and when I checked it....yeah I was in 2nd gear. Ever since then, my nickname became 2ndGear!!! LOL

I second this, last time i made a complete fool of my self for not being able to get up a small incline in front of a packed restaurant it was because i thought i was in first gear.

I have had to battle that same thought more than once. I use all my failures as learning tools rather than get discouraged by them. That day I dropped the bike on my foot was probably the single best thing that has happened for my riding. It was embarrassing (I did it in front of a crowd of experienced riders naturally) but that single event got me more determined than ever and I am a better rider because of it.

Analyse and apply what you have learned.
Also good advice
 

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Don't be so hard on yourself. This is a skill that most folks struggle with at first and is not covered in the MSF course. Like you, when I was first riding I dropped the bike trying to get started when I stopped for a stop sign on a steep incline. Humiliation. But for whatever reason, just like all aspects of riding it got easier and easier and I don't struggle with it anymore. Almost no matter how steep the surface (I live in a VERY hilly town) I don't get intimidated if I have to stop on the hill. I used to pick my route to avoid certain problematic intersections, and I don't anymore.

You'll get the hang of it. Also keep the bars faced straight ahead until you really feel that gear engage and start the forward pull. If you stall with the bars turned, you will drop the bike, period.
 

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I was so discouraged with my ride today.

I drove around town getting used to my bike I picked up last night. I rode a long time ago, but am new to it now.

I decided to go down to my mom's. She's about 20 minutes away. The last 8 minutes, they had rain down there. I was nervous riding in the light rain and the wet roads, some with little streams in the road. I didn't have any issues.

Rode back home, never rained up here. I live at the top of a steep hill. I normally take the road that has no stops, but that road was closed, so I had to come up a pretty good hill and stop at the top. I dropped it (slowly), trying to start on the hill.

Felt really stupid and flustered. Luckily, a guy from the apartments was outside and helped me get it back up and push it to a more level spot. No damage to me or the bike (slightly sore in my lower back)

Didn't tell the Mr.

Suggestions for hills? I've read to practice flat and gradual hills by keeping your right foot on the brake and clutching, throttle and releasing the foot brake is a good way to do it.
Sorry to hear about this. Hills are hard for me to, but i am getting better...it just takes time i guess. I have a very steep hill with a stop light half way up.

I keep my foot on the rear brake, i am not coordinated enough to do the front brake thing or have both feet dow.

Stick with it...it will come.
 

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Glad you and the bike are ok. I have dropped mine before because I didn't get the kiskstand down....in front of O'Reilly's auto parts. And of course I have to be the fool that parks right in front of the door!

Thomas Alva Edison once remarked "I didn't fail, I just found 10,000 ways that didn't work", and another favorite of his"Many of lifes's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up"!
 

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Glad you're ok. I hope you don't give up. New riders all have 'moments' where they think maybe they shouldn't ride and it's those moments that mean you just need a little practice. You'll progress in your skills, your safety-conciouness will uncover your natural instinct for survival. Then you'lll never again consider giving up. Be patient with yourself and above all practice for that hill and take it on!

If you really want to see how good you can get head to youtube.com and search for "Motorcycle Skills", search for "Motorcycle Rodeo", and search for "Palladino". You'll see what exciting things you're capable of!
 

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Personally I have two feet down, hold the front brake for three, good reasons. First, I'm riding a 940 pound motorcyle that isn't hugely forgiving if you stop one footed and the foot slips. Second reason is short legs and third is a not too great left knee.
 
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