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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a beginning level mechanic. I can change the oil and plugs on my '99 Honda Shadow 1100. I've successfully replaced some cables and a few other 'peripheral ' parts but now I have a more 'in depth' problem. The engine will not turn. The battery has charge, the starter works and the plugs are firing.
I believe it is the stator.
What tools do I need?
Am I going to need gaskets
Does this project require a lift?
 

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So if you have the key on and the run switch is in the correct position the starter will turn the engine over, but it will not start. Is that correct?

And welcome to the forum.
 

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Why do you believe it's your stator? Does it not charge when it runs? If you have spark, all that's left is fuel and air. Is your petcock on? The most important question is, do you have a service manual? If not, get an OEM Honda service manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just downloaded the owners manual. Trying to find what I need there.
I checked the plugs by pulling them, one by one, and grounding. I cleaned them with gas. There is definitely spark.
Petcock is on.
 

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Is the fuel fresh? Do you have fuel at fuel bowls when you open the drain screws? If no fuel at bowls, does your bike have a fuel pump and is it working? If you've been cranking it, make sure the battery is fully charged. Your bike needs a full charge in the battery to fire properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:( Next Step

:-( I had to be towed.
The Honda dealership has told me that if I tow it to them they 'may not' be willing to fix it. Also, there is no way of knowing what the cost might be.

We have a couple of 'shade tree' mechanics that are willing to come to the house, but I need to learn this stuff.

I'm going through the manual now to figure out how to get the plate off to test the stator. There are a couple of videos on YouTube, but nothing that specifically goes into this situation.
 

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:-( I had to be towed.
The Honda dealership has told me that if I tow it to them they 'may not' be willing to fix it. Also, there is no way of knowing what the cost might be.

We have a couple of 'shade tree' mechanics that are willing to come to the house, but I need to learn this stuff.

I'm going through the manual now to figure out how to get the plate off to test the stator. There are a couple of videos on YouTube, but nothing that specifically goes into this situation.
Why are you assuming it's the stator? Is it's not starting, you shouldn't even be looking at the stator. Is has nothing to do with starting. You should check for fuel if you have spark.
There is no plate/cover that you have to take off to test the stator. The stator connector is either under the front of your seat or the left side battery cover.
 

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1999 VT1100C2 A. C. E.
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Before you go running out to buy parts and a lift SLOW DOWN.

You don't diagnose a problem with the owner's manual. It's not that kind of book.

Somewhere you heard someone say "stator?" Did he/she say "regulator/rectifier?" Or "electrical connections," "short," "open" or even "circuit?" If you didn't hear any of those words then you weren't listening to the right person.

You want help from us here, it would probably help to identify your bike. Is it a 1999 1100 Aero?

You posted "the engine will not turn." Did the lights light? Did they stay lit when you pressed the start button? Did they light up when you released the button?

Here's a hint: You don't need to check the stator, spark plugs or fuel delivery system when the engine won't turn over. You need to focus on the electrical system.
o ALWAYS start with the battery. Got a voltmeter or multimeter? If not, get one; they're cheap. If so, what is the battery voltage?

o If the battery shows anywhere between 11.5 and 13.2 volts then you probably have a good battery and charging system. (The stator is part of the charging system. So is the regulator/rectifier.) You need to check all the electrical connections and the 30 amp fuse. Then the start switch if everything else looks good.

o If you get that far without finding a problem, pull the battery and take it to an auto parts store for a load test. It takes a few seconds. Many auto parts stores will do it for free. I'd be surprised if there wasn't one near you that would.

o If your battery tests below 11.5 volts then pull it. Take it to that auto parts store for charging and a load test. (Load test is useless on a battery that isn't "fully" charged. "Fully" will mean anything between 11.5 and 13.2 volts.) My guess is that you've got a battery problem and this is where you'll end up. You might or might not have other problems; maybe you created some when you "successfully replaced cables and a few other 'peripheral' parts."

Yes, I know you posted "the battery has charge." MEANINGLESS without the number of volts. Contradicts your stator diagnosis, too. And, btw, a fully-charged battery can fail a load test; that would mean the battery is toast.
 

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but now I have a more 'in depth' problem. 1)The engine will not turn. 2)The battery has charge, the starter works and the plugs are firing3)I believe it is the stator. .<<< UNQUOTE >>>

1) Is the engine locked up?
2)Do I understand that the engine turns (NOW)
3)Why??? Stator is an alternator, has nothing to do with the symptoms you describe..
;) Step Away from the motorcycle! ;)
At least until you read the service manuals troubleshooting suggestions...

We can guide you through this diagnosis...

LLLL, bring it over, the lift is empty :D
 

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Most batteries in a 12 volt system should test out at about 12.6 vDC with a full charge and the engine off. If you have at least that I would say the battery is good which in turn pretty much rules out everything else in the charging system. Now it's time to start looking at starter issues. Maybe the starter is pulling too much amperage when you're trying to start the bike. Another thing would be to make sure all your connections are tight and non corroded. Do some voltage drops on the all the connections coming off the battery to make sure everything is good to go.
 

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Hey Micro !!!!
the stator is not that hard to change, but doubt that it is your problem. I dont know what part of atlanta you are in.....but the guys at Freewheeling Honda in Douglasville have done me good since 1976!!!! if ya cant figure your problem out give them a chance.
 

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Most batteries in a 12 volt system should test out at about 12.6 vDC with a full charge and the engine off.
Maybe. Capacity of a typical new lead-acid 12 volt battery is 13.2 volts. Generally, a table of state of charge derived from voltage will look something like this at 80° F:

12.66v . . . . . . . . . . 100%
12.45v . . . . . . . . . . 75%
12.24v . . . . . . . . . . 50%
12.06v . . . . . . . . . . 25%
11.89v . . . . . . . . . . 0%

Capacity diminishes as the battery ages, redefining the word "full" for that particular battery. Our spark plugs will not fire with less than about 8 volts. Our starters will not turn the engine with something less than about 10.5 volts. (Those numbers might vary from one bike to another.) And a "full" charge doesn't necessarily mean the battery is good. Put a load on the battery and the voltage *might* drop to approximately zero -- a sure sign of an internal failure.
 

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Most batteries in a 12 volt system should test out at about 12.6 vDC with a full charge and the engine off. If you have at least that I would say the battery is good which in turn pretty much rules out everything else in the charging system. Now it's time to start looking at starter issues. Maybe the starter is pulling too much amperage when you're trying to start the bike. Another thing would be to make sure all your connections are tight and non corroded. Do some voltage drops on the all the connections coming off the battery to make sure everything is good to go.
Don't know where you got that 12.6vdc. Typical battery should test 13.2-13.6vdc. Nominal charge per cell should be about 2.1-2.3vdc per cell.
 

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Don't know where you got that 12.6vdc. Typical battery should test 13.2-13.6vdc. Nominal charge per cell should be about 2.1-2.3vdc per cell.
More like 2.2 volts from each of six cells = 13.2 volts would be typical for a lead-acid battery we'd get for our bikes. Not that there are no other possibilities, just that they are unlikely. Most of us would be lucky to get 13.2 volts a couple of months after buying a new battery. That's why 12.6 volts is generally considered a "full" charge.
 
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