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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, so I switched out the voltage regulator, and put a brand new battery in. Still will not start, not sure when it happens, but it blows the ignition fuse, either when I turn the key or press the start switch. Could it be the new voltage regulator? I'm going to put the old one back in to see if that changes anything, it is that a bad idea? Also I searched the forums for simalar issues found some the most useful thing I got from them was to check to see how the fuses blew, exploded or melted. Going to bike now will answer that question when I get there.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Ok I got to bike and put in the new 10 amp fuse, connected the old voltage regulator, still wouldn't start. Like an idiot I then reconnected the new voltage regulator and tried to start it, with out checking the fuse first. Still no start, checked the fuse and it has blown. Oh the fuses are with out a doubt exploding not melting.
 

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I’m not a bike mechanic, but I used to own a ’57 GMC pick-up. When I replaced the voltage regulator on it, I had to polarize it first. I doubt that is your problem, but just thought I’d mention it as a head’s up since I don’t know about bike voltage regulators.
 

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@Cerberus, that was back in the olden days of generators.But when cars went to alternators and especially sold state regulators that went away.

The bike regulator is solid state so no need to polarize.


Does the ignition fuse blow as soon as the battery is connected or when you turn the ignition switch on?


You can disconnect the main regulator connector and see if it stops blowing.
 

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The regulator is part of the charging system with the stater. The ignition is a different circuit so I don't understand why you suddenly have a blown ignition fuse, unless some of the wiring was interfered with when the regulator or battery was put in. Maybe a wire pinched under one of those?
Or if you had to wire the regulator connections one at a time yourself, instead of a main plug, maybe a green ground wire is connected to where it should not be.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@Cerberus, that was back in the olden days of generators.But when cars went to alternators and especially sold state regulators that went away.

The bike regulator is solid state so no need to polarize.


Does the ignition fuse blow as soon as the battery is connected or when you turn the ignition switch on?


You can disconnect the main regulator connector and see if it stops blowing.
It blows when I turn the key to on.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The regulator is part of the charging system with the stater. The ignition is a different circuit so I don't understand why you suddenly have a blown ignition fuse, unless some of the wiring was interfered with when the regulator or battery was put in. Maybe a wire pinched under one of those?
Or if you had to wire the regulator connections one at a time yourself, instead of a main plug, maybe a green ground wire is connected to where it should not be.
I don't know much, well , anything about bike motors let alone the electrical systems, lol, but this thing has me hooked now. I going figure this out. It makes sense now that it's not the regulator ( even though the old regulator was causing all kinds of problems, over charging the battery, blowing headlights, the ingition module, etc). I guessing it died( no power at all to anything) because the regulator finally killed the battery, when switched the regulator out I replaced the battery, had power again but that's when it started blowing the fuse. First thing I did was check battery connections. At the time I didn't think much about this but when I decided to. Double check how I had the battery connected, as I was removing the positive terminal screw, the screw driver sparked after a few turns, I just assummed It touched something metal near it and sparked. I'm not even sure if that would happen would it? I also didn't mention this because at the time it seemed that I wouldn't be important but the right side cover broke and I had not gotten new ones yet when this started and I was having to run with the bike while straddling it so I could pop the clutch to start it, maybe my legs pinched something? I'm going to my bike now and I'm going to sit there try to figure this out . I have no idea how to find a short but that's what this place is for, right? Someone else has had this exact problem and figured it out and are not mechanics or electricans. Any instructions on how to use find this short to ground would be helpful.
It's gotta be the connection to the battery . That's where I'll start
I'm not a good writer I tend to ramble on using run on sentences or fragments so. I hope this makes sense.
Thank you btw for your advice.
 

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One good thing is that it is related to the 10 amp ignition fuse and only past the ignition switch. So hopefully you have a manual with a wiring diagram.

Here is one I found of the ignition circuit. First out of the switch it goes to the fuses.

The power goes out of the ignition fuse directly to the ignition module and to the handlebar switches. Did you work on any wiring up there?

Then it goes out of the kill switch to the coils. So if you start unplugging each section it can help find the shorted spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One good thing is that it is related to the 10 amp ignition fuse and only past the ignition switch. So hopefully you have a manual with a wiring diagram.

Here is one I found of the ignition circuit. First out of the switch it goes to the fuses.

The power goes out of the ignition fuse directly to the ignition module and to the handlebar switches. Did you work on any wiring up there?

Then it goes out of the kill switch to the coils. So if you start unplugging each section it can help find the shorted spot.
i have not touched anything up there, but, back in September when i had similar issue, my mechanic traced it to the ignition module and replaced it. I will try what you suggested, oddly enough its raining today, it never rains this late in May in San Francisco! Worst comes to worst i take bike in on the 21st for the cosmetic damages caused by someone tipping it over and he will figure it out. lol.
 

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Since the ignition module seemed to be a problem and was replaced, you might want to go to it and examine all the wiring around it for damage. And unplug the module and then turn on the key and see if the fuse still blows. If it doesn't you narrowed it down.
When it tipped over did any battery acid spill out on to near by parts?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Since the ignition module seemed to be a problem and was replaced, you might want to go to it and examine all the wiring around it for damage. And unplug the module and then turn on the key and see if the fuse still blows. If it doesn't you narrowed it down.
When it tipped over did any battery acid spill out on to near by parts?
No, i just took that battery out last week and put the new one in and did not see any damage to it. it had just started being an issue when i took it in for damage assessment ( i did not report to insurance for a few weeks thinking i could just put a new mirror on and replace the back turn signal my self, but since it feel on the left side i would have had to replace the clutch....OMG! the clutch handle hit the ground hard enough to snap the rear view mirroe off at the base...mmmmm....any way, it was when i took it in for that assessment and told him it was starting to sometimes not start that he noticed that the regulator was going bad, and we decided that when i took itin for the repairs he would take care of that then. he cautioned me to ride as little as possible and to ride with the high beams on all the time and not to hook it up to a charger. 2 days later it died, and here we are. lol. as isaid its raining here today in 20 years it has not rained this late into may once, until today! so no electrical system work outside today!
 
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