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Last weekend I was around two riders who both were riding new'ish purchases. One was a VTX-1800 and the other was riding a Yamaha 1900. One rider had moved up from a Honda 1300 and the other previously owned a 1100 V-Star.

Watching from behind I noticed that on several stops both would ocassionally tip the bikes when making normal stops. No drops but it did look a bit precarious.

There's a bit of a change in braking technique that most folks who ride big bikes use that may be worth knowing if you ever decide to move to a really heavy bike or even test ride one. A VTX-1800 weighs in at around 800, I imagine the Yama is a bit more, my HD Ultra is 880 lbs wet and GW is typically a bit over 900 sitting on the curb. When these bikes get to tipping, things can get out of hand pretty quick and if you put a passenger on the back, well it is a whole different game. So being able to stop straight and straight up becomes a priority.

The BRC will tell you to use both brakes through a complete stop. Normally that works peachy. But what a whole lot of folks do on bigger cruisers and tourers is when the bikes gets below 10 mph or the last several feet is use only the back brake. This keeps braking inline with the frame, helps upright the bike a bit and also helps overcome those nasty pavement imperfections that can move the front tire out of alignment and thus tip the bike. Keep your eyes up and straight ahead.

Now before someone starts screaming, this is for planned, geezer rider type stops and not running up on a light or stop sign and slamming on the brakes. You have to be going slow enough that you aren't going to skid. Skidding is bad, ok? But so is dropping a bike if the front tire is out of line and you are on the front brake. :D
 

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rmw said:
if you put a passenger on the back, well it is a whole different game. So being able to stop straight and straight up becomes a priority.

But what a whole lot of folks do on bigger cruisers and tourers is when the bikes gets below 10 mph or the last several feet is use only the back brake. This keeps braking inline with the frame, helps upright the bike a bit and also helps overcome those nasty pavement imperfections line. :D
This has become a the technique of choice with my wife onboard. We are pushing 1000 lbs. total on the 1100. Thus I wish I had a old style "standard" MC for low speed handling. Still looking into that for a 2nd. bike.
 

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rmw said:
But what a whole lot of folks do on bigger cruisers and tourers is when the bikes gets below 10 mph or the last several feet is use only the back brake. This keeps braking inline with the frame, helps upright the bike a bit and also helps overcome those nasty pavement imperfections that can move the front tire out of alignment and thus tip the bike.
Very nice tip, and even with my mid size bike and my own weight (appx 800lbs total) I tried using this with this mornings practice ride.

Worked great, looks like a good technique even with any bike.

Thanks!
Eric
 

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Thanks for the tip. Even though my bike is only 500 lbs, I'll give it a try on my way home from work this afternoon.

Dan.
 

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Coolride said:
Makes sense, diving the front forks down is too much feedback for some to handle.
? i think its feed back telling you there is an issue with the bike. 'a lot' of fork dive is indicative of an improper suspension setup. with the suspension loaded like that and either at or near the bottoming out point one bump is all it takes to move the bike into a realm that no one can control.
 

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That sounds about like my typical braking maneuver, I ain`t give it no thought till now though...
I have been known to "skid" the front tire in a panic stop too... (scared the CRap outta me too!!!)
Just Make SURE there ain`t nothing on the pavement that`ll give way while HARD on the front brake!!!
AND DO NOT turn them handlebars!!!

Motorman says "if you look down, You`re going Down..."

Coming home last night, I came across a whole herd of Deer and was in a situation to use the brakes hard, All went well...
 

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rmw said:
The BRC will tell you to use both brakes through a complete stop. Normally that works peachy. But what a whole lot of folks do on bigger cruisers and tourers is when the bikes gets below 10 mph or the last several feet is use only the back brake. This keeps braking inline with the frame, helps upright the bike a bit and also helps overcome those nasty pavement imperfections that can move the front tire out of alignment and thus tip the bike. Keep your eyes up and straight ahead.
I dont care HOW you slice it, but I consider this bad advice. I BARELY use my rear brake at all with speeds under 30. And the last 10 when stopping is all front cause I am getting ready to put my FEET down. And putting your feet down helps a lot more in keeping the bike upright then any rear brake tracking.

Yeah, you said this is for "Old Geezer" style stopping. Well, if you are so old that you are having trouble with an 800 lb bike then maybe it is time to gibe up riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
MidnightToker said:
I dont care HOW you slice it, but I consider this bad advice. I BARELY use my rear brake at all with speeds under 30. And the last 10 when stopping is all front cause I am getting ready to put my FEET down. And putting your feet down helps a lot more in keeping the bike upright then any rear brake tracking.

Yeah, you said this is for "Old Geezer" style stopping. Well, if you are so old that you are having trouble with an 800 lb bike then maybe it is time to gibe up riding.
Toker I'd be a lot more inclined to listen to your point of view if you could actually manage a post where you disagree with someone without making some snide, nasty comment and making everything personal. As it is you come across as a nasty mean spirited person not worth reading.

Also since your pushing around the same 650 pound bike I rode for a number of years and which I also would have agreed with you if that was the subject, I think I'll just ignore your opinion. If that's ok with you. If not, well you'll have to get over it because quite frankly, if there was a way to block your posts, I would have done it some time ago.
 

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My only issue is this: you don't want to ingrain a bad habit...like avoiding the front brake. Brakes are your friends and the front brake is paramount in getting stopped in a timely manner. If you make a habit of avoiding using it...

In a conventional stop, say a stoplight or sign, if you're sticking the front into the ground and after stopping the rebound is knocking you over? Then you've got technique problems but the problem isn't with the front brake it's probably with where you're putting you eyes. Motorman is right, look down? Go down. Stop, look right while you're foot down? The bike is gonna tip left. Look left as you put your foot down? The bike is gonna tip left.

The technique is keep your head and eyes up. IF in the last couple of really low speed feet you ease off the front? Cool. In low speed situations dragging the rear can nicely stabilize the bike--BUT--you're practicing low speed riding and stopping NOT braking. It's a fine distinction but an important one. [/u]
 
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