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'99 VT750CD ACE
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Call 'em what you will... I'm looking for a set, went on Amazon only to find about 1000 choices. Anyone have some that they recommend?

I appreciate any input!
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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'99 VT750CD ACE
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks @swifty2014 , That is similar to one of the sets I was looking at. First job for them will actually be a lawn tractor. Last time I did the tires I used screw drivers and pry bars but had to be super careful not to chew up the rim!
 

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I went with this set of three carbon steel irons, because I wanted something small enough to ride in my moto tool kit and the 6.5" inchers that came with my Royal Enfield, didn't have quite enough leverage to do the job on the roadside. Motorcycle Tire Iron Lever Spoon Tools Set Tire Changer Rim Bike Changing Repair | eBay A set of 3 of these was less than $12 last year when I purchased. One of these 9.5" irons, plus two of the 6.5" shorties I already had, fit in my tool pouch, and were capable of performing a changeover of the tube tires on my RE, but I haven't tried it on the fatter tires of my Shadows yet.

I had considered one of these alloy irons that incorporate a large box end, Tusk Aluminum Tire Iron with Axle Wrench 27 mm - Fits GASGAS EX 300 2021-2022 | eBay but they didn't offer the correct size for the axle nut of the bike I had in mind, so instead I spent the money on a good quality 8" crescent wrench with the capability to handle nuts up to 30mm. Lobtex Shrimp Hybrid Adjustable Wrench Japan NEW 200mm UM30 Genuine DIY Work 4963202044738 | eBay Usually, a nut this big requires a 10" crescent wrench.

I have a couple of screwdrivers that got so worn out that instead of resharpening them, I rounded off the tips, so they could be more safely used for these kinds of tasks. There's always something around the shop that needs a good poke or prod.
 

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'99 VT750CD ACE
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a couple of screwdrivers that got so worn out that instead of resharpening them, I rounded off the tips, so they could be more safely used for these kinds of tasks. There's always something around the shop that needs a good poke or prod.
Funny I was thinking the same thing. With hand-me down tools from my dad and granddad I have plenty but some of those are real old classics and I can't bring myself to modify them. Although they're probably looking down from heaven thinking don't spend the $$, modify the damn screwdriver! 😁
 

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02 1100 Spirit / 2012 Goldwing
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Harbor Freight has em. I bought 3 and rim protectors from Cycle Gear.
 
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2007 VT750DC Spirit “chopper”
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You want this style, everything else is useless, has a sharper tip making it easier to poke tubes and and the double sided ones are clunky at best. Get the rounded nose with grippy handle, I even use em to break the beads.

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BTW to get the tire to break the bead I run it over with a car. LOL. That is usually the hardest thing to do. C Clamp will do as well but much harder to do.
 

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I`ve been using the same ones for the last 50 years...
Bought `em back " in the day" when I had my 1971 CB750-Four...
No need to replace them as yet,
Dennis
 

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BTW to get the tire to break the bead I run it over with a car. LOL. That is usually the hardest thing to do. C Clamp will do as well but much harder to do.
If you deflate the tire and take a spoon under the lip then pry it down as far as you can you can wedge another spoon in upside down and catch the lip of the tire, enough strength pulling up while pushing the other spoon down and it’ll pop the bead pretty readily, did it with both front and rear tires on my Spirit and I’ve even done it with car tires.
 
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Just about any tire irons will do the job. More length equals more leverage but they are harder to pack on the bike if changing a tire on the side of the road is your thing.

No matter which ones you buy check the edges of the tool to verify there are no burrs or sharp edges. If there are just hit them with a file or sandpaper.

No matter how good the tools are you always run the chance of pinching a tube. So always watch where you are prying.

Eric


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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You want this style, everything else is useless, has a sharper tip making it easier to poke tubes and and the double sided ones are clunky at best. Get the rounded nose with grippy handle, I even use em to break the beads.

View attachment 297586
Good to know, the set I bought looks just like these. I think they had 11" and 14", I went with the 14" for a little bit more leverage. I never thought of using my truck to drive over to break the bead! I have used a large C clamp though.
@"Captain D" if these last 50years my sons will be inheriting them!
 

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Yes, @Bdilz99 our son is already heir to our fortune of used parts & tools too...
We`ve already signed the land over, so there ain`t no inheritance taxes applied ;)
I think I bought them spoons, back when I was 14, to fix a tire on our FIRST Motorcycle my buddy & I halved, the Bridgestone 350 scrambler...

If So, that makes them even older by 3 years,
Dennis

Life goes on
 
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