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Any suggestions on how to get the last little bit of tire over the rim? It’s stretched so tight I can’t get I tire iron between the rim and tire. I’ve tried windex and heat with no luck.
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You need to push the top bead that is directly opposite that last section down and into the center groove of the rim, this will give a bit more leeway to stretch the last bit you’re working on over. Don’t force it how it is right now, you could rip the tire bead if you try and force it. Take your knee and jam all your weight into the sidewall of the tire directly 180 degrees away from the unmounted portion of the tire that is giving you issues. Let up a little pressure on your tire spoons while doing this, you’ll usually feel the tire give a bit so the last bit can be mounted more easily.
 

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Do you have the other side squeezed tight together into the center "drop zone" area of the wheel?
Is the tire warmed up?
Some bad language but a good video=

 

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Good advice above. Windex won't help you much. Try dish soap and water mix. Tire iron is too thick really. A set of actual tire levers would work much better. As you try to lift the last bit of the tire go around and squeeze the rest of the bead to the center of the wheel. Take it slow and work your lever up and down. It will eventually slip on. 2 sets of hands really help too.
 

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Maybe this is another one of those personal opinion type things, but I prefer Windex as it doesn't remain slippery forever and won't come back to life as bubbles in the wet, I used to be a Dawn and water spray guy.
Usually a motorcycle tire on a motorcycle rim is mostly straight forward and not too much of a stretch, with of course the occasional exceptional combo.
I will usually just walk the last bit of tire over the rim working from each side with my boots. I have seen folks take a rubber hammer to that last bit of bead successfully, but I have not done that myself.
That last bit is really IMO too tight for levers and the potential to damage the bead or the rim is high with them jammed in there.

Now silicone spray, as per the video, I'd never use as it is slippery forever and one of the most annoying things that can happen with a motorcycle with a tube type tire is to spin the rim and tear out the valve stem.
 

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You need to push the top bead that is directly opposite that last section down and into the center groove of the rim, this will give a bit more leeway to stretch the last bit you’re working on over. Don’t force it how it is right now, you could rip the tire bead if you try and force it. Take your knee and jam all your weight into the sidewall of the tire directly 180 degrees away from the unmounted portion of the tire that is giving you issues. Let up a little pressure on your tire spoons while doing this, you’ll usually feel the tire give a bit so the last bit can be mounted more easily.
As stated above, drop the mounted tire into the center groove of the rim which should give you the slack to pull it over that last little bit.
 

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Thanks for the tips. I won't be able to get to it for a few days, but I'll give the suggestions a try. I,very seen the zip tie method before, but I don't understand what advantage it gives.
The advantage to the zip tie method is that it pinches the beads of the tire together to allow them to more easily slip into the center depression of the wheel. When mounting a tire the entire goal is to depress the top bead into the center of the wheel to give the wheel vs tire diameter enough space to both slip over the outer edge of the wheel but also mount tightly to the inside.
 

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I've used prybars, or heavy duty screwdrivers. Never used a tire iron. Last bike I used a crowbar. Definitely made sure the tire was pushed down so I could walk the tire over the lip. Never used soap and water to seal a tire on the bead. Just water and a spray bottle. I did have to bead seal the front tire on my shadow, the bead didn't seal and kept leaking
 

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Oh the Joy of doing it myself!! :D
Yeah, don`tchya just hate when you can`t ride because something ain`t going right???
BUT I wouldn`t pay someone else to do it...

You`ll get it, Patience is a vertue,
Dennis

I LIKE that clamp @adlowe
 

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I’ve done A LOT of tires in my day, from working at multiple automotive tire shops and car dealers to small engine shops with lawn mower and atv repair there is one single design of tire spoon you MUST have if you’re doing non-car tires yourself at home.

These. This tip profile is second to none, buy no other spoons IMO. Amazon.com: Dr.Roc Tire Spoon Lever Dirt Bike Lawn Mower Motorcycle Tire Changing Tools with Durable Bag 3 Tire Irons 2 Rim Protectors 1 Valve Core and Caps Set: Automotive

Doesn’t matter who makes them, that tip profile is by far the best and can actually break and dismount the beads from a wheel if used flipped over. I’ve used those spoons to break 16” car tire beads, they kick ass.
 

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No- Mar makes a good product. I have one of their machines and I love it. I don't have the extra hand tool but the "yellow thing" is amazing.
 

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^^^^^
What did you decide on tire's this time?
 
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