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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I checked my Tire pressure today and both tires were about 3 lbs down.

Couldnt help but thinking i was getting a low reading due to the temp,
around 55 out and had been much colder earlier today.

Can cold temps (even colder than 55) effect the accuracy of a tire pressure reading??

They say to check them "Cold" but how cold is too cold before you risk over filling the tires due to a "Cold reading" of PSI being inaccurate?
 

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Air will contract more as it gets colder, if it is going to stay at a certain temp set them for that, if its only a couple days then getting warmer don't worry about it. I always fill mine, car or bike if its going to be a prolonged cold spell. When it starts warming up make sure you recheck them and let air out if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Air will contract more as it gets colder, if it is going to stay at a certain temp set them for that, if its only a couple days then getting warmer don't worry about it. I always fill mine, car or bike if its going to be a prolonged cold spell. When it starts warming up make sure you recheck them and let air out if needed.
i guess i'll re-check tomorrow :roll:

thanks
 

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Tires will lose psi the colder it gets, roughly 1 psi per degree. The opposite however is not true (ie. gaining psi as temps rise). This is due to air pressure and expansion contraction of air/metal. The best thing to do is check weekly unless you have a wide temp swing-always use the same gauge every time (not type-the exact same gauge).

Dingo.
 

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I've reduced my psi to increase front wheel grip in the cold greasy conditions. I had a scare the other week I don't want to repeat.
 

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On accountta the reaction to moving over the centerline paint from my (new to me) Shinko tires, I`ve been leery of their handling ability, until yesterday...
Riding in rain on the very wet highway at 55 mph, I felt the grip of these tires...
They didn`t slip at all!!
Even running through standing water...

Check pressure and tread wear regularly,
D
 

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On accountta the reaction to moving over the centerline paint from my (new to me) Shinko tires, I`ve been leery of their handling ability, until yesterday...
Riding in rain on the very wet highway at 55 mph, I felt the grip of these tires...
They didn`t slip at all!!
Even running through standing water...

Check pressure and tread wear regularly,
D
With the Dunlops I used to have, I could feel the rear tire get a little squirrely every once in a while, especially in cold winter months, but I have never felt anything squirrely with the Shinkos. I've had nothing but good things to say about them.
 

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Yeah, you MAY recall, I robbed these fairly new tires from my Magna to use on my ACE, since I am not ready to sink Honda Buck$ into the V4 just yet...
I`ve been cautious on these tires on accountta them following the centerline on my country road & not feeling like other new tires I`ve had...
But all fear is gone :D

You have seen my "Pirelli is my Drug of choice" posts over the years, Shinko ain`t bad!!!
I LIKE `EM!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I checked my Tire pressure today and both tires were about 3 lbs down.

Couldnt help but thinking i was getting a low reading due to the temp,
around 55 out and had been much colder earlier today.

Can cold temps (even colder than 55) effect the accuracy of a tire pressure reading??

They say to check them "Cold" but how cold is too cold before you risk over filling the tires due to a "Cold reading" of PSI being inaccurate?
i guess i'll re-check tomorrow :roll:

thanks
I checked the Air pressure again today since it warmed up a lot and each tire was exatly 2 lbs higher psi than i set it at yesterday in the colder weather.

I brought it back to 32/39* and went for a nice ride, it was 74 degrees today, tomorrow forcasted for 75 :mrgreen:

Felt good

* Metzeler ME880's
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Tires will lose psi the colder it gets, roughly 1 psi per degree. The opposite however is not true (ie. gaining psi as temps rise). This is due to air pressure and expansion contraction of air/metal. The best thing to do is check weekly unless you have a wide temp swing-always use the same gauge every time (not type-the exact same gauge).

Dingo.
Actually i think the psi goes down 1 psi for every 10 degrees, according to the attached article.

This proved out today because it was exactly 20 degrees warmer today and the psi in my tires rose exactly 2 psi from yesterday.




"Accommodating Variables

Indoor-to-outdoor Temperature Variation. Significant differences between the conditions tire pressures are set (the warmth of an attached garage, heated garage or service shop) and in which the vehicle will be driven (winter's subfreezing temperatures) requires inflating tires 1 psi higher than recommended on the placard for every 10° F difference in temperature between interior and exterior temperatures.

Afternoon Ambient Temperature Increase.* Set 2 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations when installing new tires or if the vehicle has been parked in the shade for a few hours.

Tire Heat Generated While Being Driven (or at speeds of less than 45 mph).* - Set 4 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.

Heat Generated While Being Driven Extensively (or at sustained speeds greater than 45 mph).* Set 6 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.

Do Not Release Hot Tire Pressure if any of these variables could be the cause of measured tire pressure exceeding the maximum psi branded on the tire's sidewall by the 2, 4 or 6 psi indicated above for the various conditions. This temporary pressure increase is expected and designed into the tire's capabilities.

*NOTE: Tires on a parked vehicle exposed to direct sunlight will appear overinflated due to the heat absorbed from the radiant energy of the sun. Pressures cannot be accurately set on these tires until all have stabilized in the shade."

The recommendations i quoted above are for car tires and posted just as an example of what temperature does to tire psi inflation readings.

This info came from here:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=147
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Actually i think the psi goes down 1 psi for every 10 degrees, according to the attached article.

This proved out today because it was exactly 20 degrees warmer today and the psi in my tires rose exactly 2 psi from yesterday.




"Accommodating Variables

Indoor-to-outdoor Temperature Variation. Significant differences between the conditions tire pressures are set (the warmth of an attached garage, heated garage or service shop) and in which the vehicle will be driven (winter's subfreezing temperatures) requires inflating tires 1 psi higher than recommended on the placard for every 10° F difference in temperature between interior and exterior temperatures.

Afternoon Ambient Temperature Increase.* Set 2 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations when installing new tires or if the vehicle has been parked in the shade for a few hours.

Tire Heat Generated While Being Driven (or at speeds of less than 45 mph).* - Set 4 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.

Heat Generated While Being Driven Extensively (or at sustained speeds greater than 45 mph).* Set 6 psi above vehicle manufacturer's cold inflation recommendations.

Do Not Release Hot Tire Pressure if any of these variables could be the cause of measured tire pressure exceeding the maximum psi branded on the tire's sidewall by the 2, 4 or 6 psi indicated above for the various conditions. This temporary pressure increase is expected and designed into the tire's capabilities.

*NOTE: Tires on a parked vehicle exposed to direct sunlight will appear overinflated due to the heat absorbed from the radiant energy of the sun. Pressures cannot be accurately set on these tires until all have stabilized in the shade."


This info came from here:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=147

The recommendations i quoted above are for car tires and posted just as an example of what temperature does to tire psi inflation readings.
 

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On accountta the reaction to moving over the centerline paint from my (new to me) Shinko tires, I`ve been leery of their handling ability, until yesterday...
Riding in rain on the very wet highway at 55 mph, I felt the grip of these tires...
They didn`t slip at all!!
Even running through standing water...

Check pressure and tread wear regularly,
D
I had a Shinko 777 for a while, the wear was pretty poor at only 4500mi but the handling, ride, and grip were excellent. And without a doubt the 777 is the best tire I've ridden on when the roads get wet. Something to be said about the soft grippy compound and excellent tread pattern for wet grip.

very surprising for a "cheap" tire, but if you factor in wear under MY conditions they cost more per mile to run. If I get 10k miles out of the Commander II tire that is currently on the rear of the aero it will have cost half as much per mile to run.
 

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Thanks for that link...very handy info there.

My bike sits longer between rides now and when it's 'nice' out, I'm so hyped to get a ride in that I hadn't checked the rear tire in -15 psi :eek: Bike felt sloppy when turning so I figured I should check. Only down 5 psi in the front though, that's a plus ;)
 

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Tires will lose psi the colder it gets, roughly 1 psi per degree. The opposite however is not true (ie. gaining psi as temps rise). This is due to air pressure and expansion contraction of air/metal. The best thing to do is check weekly unless you have a wide temp swing-always use the same gauge every time (not type-the exact same gauge).

Dingo.

What... math is that.
Just fill it with nitrogen if really concerned it cheap.
 

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I treat my bike's tires the same as the tires for my track car. They get set for the day's conditions. Maybe a little higher or lower, depending on conditions. Only difference is, the tires on my bike will not see the same high temps as my car. So fewer adjustments during the day.

Max distance on the bike has been about 200 miles per day. Figuring in stops and little temp fluctuation, my tires have shown little change in psi. Basically I set them for the day and head on down the road.

As stated before, always use the same (good quality) gauge.
 
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