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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy!


Posting in the Canadian Riders section for this question as I'm looking for value tools that are readily available in Canada. With 'value' I mean something that isn't just cheapest, nor top-of-the-line and relatively expensive. Perhaps bang for the buck tools is what I'm after. General use for them will be ... surprise ... motorcycle maintenance and will therefore be in the range of that purpose: Ratchets, sockets, flat/phillips screwdriver (perhaps one you can safely tap to break rusty screws loose), electrical meter, etc.


Reason for asking is because I'm reluctant to purchase big box branded tools as I have a feeling (but not sure) that these tools are manufactured cheaply to create 1; a cheaper than the rest product while 2; generate greater profits for themselves. If that's true, I can hardly believe a good tool comes from it. Now, if the tools hold up in terms of tolerances and overall durability, it'll be just fine. However, if there's a brand specific tool you would recommend, please do and if you can clarify why you think it's worth the money, even better! Please do keep in mind that this is for the amateur diy maintenancer.
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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I worked on foreign cars for many years and used Snap On, Proto, Mac, Matco and Craftsman, as well as any I could use to fit the need.
Craftsman have always been a very good value. Strong and lifetime guaranteed.

But Sears is disappearing so I don't know how much access you will have these days.
S-K, Stanley and others are good too for a decent price good guarantees and fine for the DIY.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Craftsman and Stanley are owned by the same company now, since 2017 I believe to have read. How do these brands compare to Mastercraft and Maximum?
 

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1983 Honda vt750 Shadow
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Stanley owns many companies now. Black and Decker, etc. Most any of the tools that have nice forgings and finish and have a guarantee would be fine for the everyday home mechanic. Some times you need a wrench that is thinner to get in tight spots so look at the sizes of the handles and ends. Very cheap tools are a bit more clunky and crude.
 

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1995 VT1100C2
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Canadian Tire often has sales on hand tools, multimeters etc that are adequate for DIY but make sure you are not buying the dirt-cheap sets. I do not like the brand "Certified" for detailed work but find Mastercraft often on sale and I am sure most of my home tools are Mastercraft.

G.
 
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