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a friend told me:

Realistically, if it's less than 15-20lbs, you wouldn't be wasting your time torquing the bolts anyway. 90% of what they give torque values for don't need to be torqued. Small parts, or simply bolting parts onto the bike don't need to be torqued. Parts where you're bolting two halves together for instance, would be torqued.
Any one care to comment on those statements?

spencer
 

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I got one of the Harbor Freight / Northern $20 units which are fine if you calibrate them. They say +-5% but don't tell you that it is at the upper end. Mine is 5 pounds off (linear, not algorithmic) meaning for a 17 foot pound setting I have to select 12. 5 off at 200 is a so what but 5 pounds high at 17 (=22 on valves) is closer to 30% off. Works fine, price is right but doesn't work below 10 and be sure you check it with a vise and dead weights. Also, good insurance to use NAPA #14 thread sealant on light torques.
 

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Been wrenching most of my life and I seldom use a torque wrench. You just get a feel for it and use some common sense based on the bolt/stud size. Now for cam caps, fork clamps etc a torque wrench is a must IMO. Harbor Freight has several fair priced units and they work very well.
 

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When I use a torque wrench it is for something that has multiple bolts holding it in place and I want to make sure I have even pressure holding it down. The best example is when I rotate tires on my cage. I snug the lugs up then torque 'em in a star pattern to 100 ft.lbs. I don't really care if my torque wrench is dead nuts on the calibration. I know that when its clicks on each lug that they all have the same (or pretty dang close) torque and as a result I'm not warping the rotor.
 

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I snug the lugs up then torque 'em in a star pattern to 100 ft.lbs.
That sounds pretty tight. Is that what is recommended? I've changed 1000s of tires and never torqued a single one. My trusty CP734 at 90 PSI has never let me down! :p
 

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Yup, those are the specs for my cage. I would do the same for torquing down a head on an engine or auto trans oil pan, anything I wanted to be snugged up evenly. Of course I would follow the recommended bolt pattern.
 

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i never use a torque wrench on all my bikes/cars for the last 35 years.
just use good tools and a common sense while working.

my feeling is my torque wrench

never had problems with that

ride safe
harry
 

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How about spark plugs and torque? I've read (in the owner manual) how to tighten new plugs of various types but the service manual has torque values. Not owning a torque wrench, I just followed the owner manual instructions. I have not noticed a problem yet.
 

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How about spark plugs and torque? I've read (in the owner manual) how to tighten new plugs of various types but the service manual has torque values. Not owning a torque wrench, I just followed the owner manual instructions. I have not noticed a problem yet.
Always safer to use a Tq-Wrench for everything. But for plugs feel is fine, tightly seat by hand and 1/2-3/4 Turn with wrench to tighten. As a general rule you should to use a Tq-wrench when dealing with aluminum and multi bolt situations. Also anytime a loose or overtightened bolt can kill you, like axel bolts and such.
 
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