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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As mentioned in my other threads, I'm looking to tour on my Shadow Spirit.

I already have the mustang seat, passenger sissy bar, saddlebags, tachometer (useful tool, I think), and Vance pipes fitted to the bike thanks to the previous owner.

What are your must-haves for touring? I'm a fairly minimalist/practical guy, and far from fancy. Most of the time I'll be stealth camping.

So far on my list is:
- Android phone (GPS, maps, email, etc)
- USB Battery packs
- DIY alcohol stove, titanium mess set
- Collapsible bucket (used as beer bucket, sink, etc)
- Camp suds (dish & body detergent)
- Collapsible shower
- Small camping towel
- Camelback hydration pack
- Backpacking Tent (2 person, marmot, light & small)
- Sleeping bag (backpacking style, down/synthetic blend, tiny, light)

- Possibly a Jerrycan depending on how remote I get

I'd like to hear from you all on your thoughts/suggested additions.

Cheers,

XXXXX
 

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2001 Valkyrie I/S
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Looks like you will need a small truck or SUV. :D

I've never camped on the bike.
I tend to use the hotels and cabins.

My parents use to camp on their Goldwing.
They pulled a small trailer and hauled all of their gear.
They loved it!

And am I the only one that doesn't know what "stealth" camping is?
Is that like camping where you don't tell anyone where you are and you stay out of sight?
 

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Dude sounds like you have a pretty sick set up going on. I'm planning a camping trip to the Kangamangus highway / Acadia for memorial day already. I'm not going to bring a tent. I go camping hammock all the way. Way more comfortable especially when you need a good night sleep from riding all day. Good call on the camelback I might start doing that.
 

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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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Add:
First Aid kit
A decent knife (legal style))
Full Honda stock tool kit.
Oil for engine
Oil for Chain if not a shafty.
A can of tire inflator/Sealant
12v to USB adapter.
Electrical wire
Mechanics wire
Decent electrical tape.
A pair of Vice-Grip 6NW pliers.

Watch: The 1960's TV show "Then Came Bronson"

Think about:
What happens when the phone dies or is out of range.
Adding a water purification kit, just in case.
 

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Deep Woods Off. Toilet Paper. Multi-tool. Flashlight (maybe phone app)
Rain gear is critical otherwise you waste a lot of time at Laundromats drying clothes.

I'd skip the shower and find a lake or other water.
I'd make sure the bike has been serviced and skip anything for the bike. Don't bother with any tools or parts except the multi-tool. You won't have the part that breaks in any case so tools will not help other than a multi-tool screwdriver and small adjustable.

G.
 

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I'd make sure the bike has been serviced and skip anything for the bike. Don't bother with any tools or parts except the multi-tool. You won't have the part that breaks in any case so tools will not help other than a multi-tool screwdriver and small adjustable.

G.
Experience leads me to disagree. A few years ago about 100 miles into a 2500 mile trip, my brother went down and sheared his left foot peg off. We were able to bolt his passenger peg into place and he finished the trip. No tools and he'd have had to call his wife to come get him and trailer it home.

My recommendation is to do your regular services (oil change, chain adjustment, air filter, etc.) using only the bike's tool kit. If you discover you need anything else to perform the basics, you should pack it for your trip.
 

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Another thing i've seen recommended for extended trips is a small tire plugging kit.

Just a thought.

SuperboyX, i just checked out that link. very cool. saved that one for future use
 

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It seems you're more interested in a camping set-up than actual touring worries. All that camping is gear is nice, but it's your bike that is supposed to get you from point A to point B. You need a plan for packing al that camping gear. A Spirit is a light bike in comparison to your average cruiser. Whatever you load on it needs to be light. Your best bet is to also pack your gear as low as possible as to not screw up your center of balance any more than necessary. Highway pegs and/or floorboards become an essential after a couple of hours on the open road. Are you in any type of physical shape to be able to sit a bike for hours on end? Are you familiar with your bikes tool set? I agree with gdb069 as bringing on a bunch of extra tools and spare parts is a waste of time, weight and storage area but it also means you need to be familiar with what is in the stock tool kit. On a street bike I'm not that big of a fan of tube changing kits if you're running spokes and tubes, but a small plugging kit for tubeless tires is handy. I'd love to hear your reasoning as to what makes a tachometer a useful tool. Either way, I'd concentrate on your bike and how to pack all the crap you're bringing along. Loose, flopping, shifting gear will screw up a good riding day as much or more than bad weather. I can tell you're all about doing this in as thrifty a manner as possible, but I'd really consider looking in to a quality set of raingear and riding apparel such as boots and stuff like that.
 

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Experience leads me to disagree. A few years ago about 100 miles into a 2500 mile trip, my brother went down and sheared his left foot peg off. We were able to bolt his passenger peg into place and he finished the trip.
The pegs are held on with just a cotter pin so a multitool should work. In any case here's why I gave up trying to predict emergency repairs:

1. My touring began on a 69 Triumph Daytona in 1970. My headlight bulb blew so used high beam and aim the headlamp lower. I decided to carry a spare jn toolkit. In 1972 my headlight blew again. AHA I have a spare! Nope...spare was broken. In 1974 headlight went again. AHA I have replaced my spare and carefully wrapped it in cloth. Broken.

2. I also cracked an aluminum side casing so carried fiberglass and resin for about 10 years but it never happened again.

3. My chain fell off. I could put it back on but the master link was missing. I carried a spare master link for 10 years along with the fiberglass and never needed.

4. I carried a tube for my tube tires for a while until the tube rotted.

5. In 1974 my Norton Commando clutch cable broke. No way to repair but I decided to carry a spare and the spare clutch cable is still in the Norton's tool kit.

I could go on but you're probably bored. Lets just say everything that went wrong could not be fixed roadside and everything I predicted may need repair, never did. So finally I gave up. I don't even pack the original toolkit. Any part that falls off that cannot be put back on with a multi-tool and small adjustable stays on the roadside.

This philosophy has taught me that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" so my bikes are well serviced.

G.
 

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The broken foot peg I mentioned wasn't a cotter pin issue. The bracket was broken, and I had to bolt the rear bracket to the front. It couldn't have been done with a multi-tool or the factory tool kit for that matter. Luck favors the prepared.
 

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I gotta agree with gdb069 on this one. With all the riding I've done the only thing that has ever happened was an overheating bike (water cooled, come to find out the fan wasn't working) and a license plate rattled off. With the over heated bike, there was no real roadside fix, and the license plate fell off because I neglected tightening it numerous times. I've known people and have heard of people who carry all kinds of extra bs along in the name of "being prepared". it always seemed like a waste of space and weight.
Most every modern bike has spare fuses near the fuse box bur has anyone ever had a fuse blow if they weren't monkeying around with it or made an incorrect repair? Extra nuts and bolts?? Really? Bikes don't vibrate enough anymore to rattle anything loose if you tightened it correctly in the first place. Extra quart of oil or two? Is your engine really drinking that much oil? Makes no sense to bring a full Snap-On tool set, wiring harness and welder along just to go down the road on 2 wheels. Make sure your bike stays serviced, don't put corrective actions off until later, and do repairs with proper replacement parts. It always seems it's the guys who "make do" with "good enough" who always seem to having to wrench on their ride. I'd rather ride and enjoy myself instead of being all tensed up wondering what's going to break next and when.

To the OP. If you are planning on doing a lot of sneaking around camping, I'd make it a point to get an oversized kickstand puck and make sure it was easily reachable.
 

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To the OP. If you are planning on doing a lot of sneaking around camping, I'd make it a point to get an oversized kickstand puck and make sure it was easily reachable.
Or just put your multi-tool under the kick stand :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It seems you're more interested in a camping set-up than actual touring worries. All that camping is gear is nice, but it's your bike that is supposed to get you from point A to point B.
yeah i no what you meen but i just want 2 go an cruise an not have to worrie about anything like that on the road thats why i got this bike cause im going touring not so i worry all day long whatever happens happens i find!!1 plus the bike is brannew and it has a 30000mile war anty so its safe andd relyable!!

You need a plan for packing al that camping gear. A Spirit is a light bike in comparison to your average cruiser.
i no its not a heavy power bike but you dont know me im not too heavy . but i do wish i was a bit lighter too though. im about 260-270 lb last time i weighed myself at doctor office and thas accurate kind of scale so i no its right im not like 300 lb or anething

Are you in any type of physical shape to be able to sit a bike for hours on end?
yes i am in good shape i work out at least onse a every week like i go walking and stuff and too i no fer sure 1000% that i can sit for a long time bcause i sit a long time at work all the time i work in a callcenter and i have to sit 8 hours or more at a time all day long at work so I know I can sit still for long periods of time. im not worried bout that at all! plus im gonna be sstoppping for gas every 600 mile or whatever so i will get even more breaks than im used to to stand up and walk around

Are you familiar with your bikes tool set?
well yes obvicuosly i cant not have tools!!!1 my bike is used so i bot it and it dint come with a tool kit but i looked online and i found what should be in it and made one myself! it wasnt even expensive i just took some of my granddads sockets and werrenches he didnt have mm sizes so i just went arond the bike and tried all the sockets on the nutz and boltz and went with the ones that fit. its not rocket science and it wasnt htat hard to do lol!!!1

I agree with gdb069 as bringing on a bunch of extra tools and spare parts is a waste of time, weight and storage area but it also means you need to be familiar with what is in the stock tool kit. On a street bike I'm not that big of a fan of tube changing kits if you're running spokes and tubes, but a small plugging kit for tubeless tires is handy.
i dont know what you mean tubes and spokes this is a motorcycle not just a normal bike mayhbe i didnt mention that before... im like a son of anarchy not lans armstrong i dont peddle around loll... but like i said i made a tool kit so i am definately totaly aware what is in it like familiar wize.

I'd love to hear your reasoning as to what makes a tachometer a useful tool.
a tachomater tells you how fast your motor is going! its like a speedo-meater but its smaller and instread of telling you how fast you bike is going on the road it tells you how fast the motor is going. otherwise you dont know you have 2 guess!!!??

Either way, I'd concentrate on your bike and how to pack all the crap you're bringing along. Loose, flopping, shifting gear will screw up a good riding day as much or more than bad weather. I can tell you're all about doing this in as thrifty a manner as possible, but I'd really consider looking in to a quality set of raingear and riding apparel such as boots and stuff like that.
i already have rubber boots for when it rains and i have a hunting coat i use when i go hungint in the rain annd its keeps me a 1000% dry every time except my hands but i can get robber gloves for wearing on my hands when it is raining and i am waring the hunting coat plus its really really warm for the cold days even tho ill be tooring in the summer (duh!!!) plus also the coate is camoflash so when i stealth camp no one can see me thats even bettter for not getting cot!!!!!111111oneoneoneleven!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I go camping hammock all the way. Way more comfortable especially when you need a good night sleep from riding all day. Good call on the camelback I might start doing that.
Thanks man... Camping hammock sounds really cool. I've never seen one used before, only pictures. I do really like the idea of being raised off the ground. What about rain and mosquito concerns? Also, what do you do when there are no suitable trees?

And don't say move to somewhere with trees :p

First Aid kit
Oil for Chain if not a shafty.
A can of tire inflator/Sealant
Electrical wire
Decent electrical tape.
A pair of Vice-Grip 6NW pliers.
Good suggestions. I'm going with them. For the electrical wire I'll just bring a 15-20' length of hookup wire. First aid kit will be minimal. And I always carry a pocket knife, so that's no issue.

Question: What would you use the mechanics wire for in the field? Can't think of anything off the top of my head that would need supporting in the field, except maybe some bushcraft.

Deep Woods Off. Toilet Paper. Multi-tool. Flashlight (maybe phone app)

Rain gear is critical otherwise you waste a lot of time at Laundromats drying clothes.

I'd skip the shower and find a lake or other water.

Don't bother with any tools or parts except the multi-tool. You won't have the part that breaks in any case so tools will not help other than a multi-tool screwdriver and small adjustable.
Good ideas here. I agree there's no point bringing too many tools. Basics will do. What kind of rain gear do you use?

I use this site to customize my own list before I road trip anywhere. You simply check off what you want to pack and print off your own custom list.

Motorcycle Trip Checklist
Ultimate list! Thank you! Stuff I've never even considered!

Mods, you can close this thread, now :)

PS: lol @ tampons/pads

Another thing i've seen recommended for extended trips is a small tire plugging kit.

Just a thought.

SuperboyX, i just checked out that link. very cool. saved that one for future use
Lots of people are saying tire repair kits/tubes/inflators/sealers. I was gonna opt out but I think I'll take it now. It's small, and I won't even notice it at the bottom of the bags.

gdb069 said:
here's why I gave up trying to predict emergency repairs:

1. My touring began on a 69 Triumph Daytona in 1970. My headlight bulb blew so used high beam and aim the headlamp lower. I decided to carry a spare jn toolkit. In 1972 my headlight blew again. AHA I have a spare! Nope...spare was broken. In 1974 headlight went again. AHA I have replaced my spare and carefully wrapped it in cloth. Broken.

2. I also cracked an aluminum side casing so carried fiberglass and resin for about 10 years but it never happened again.

3. My chain fell off. I could put it back on but the master link was missing. I carried a spare master link for 10 years along with the fiberglass and never needed.

4. I carried a tube for my tube tires for a while until the tube rotted.

5. In 1974 my Norton Commando clutch cable broke. No way to repair but I decided to carry a spare and the spare clutch cable is still in the Norton's tool kit.

I could go on but you're probably bored. Lets just say everything that went wrong could not be fixed roadside and everything I predicted may need repair, never did. So finally I gave up.
I like this. Basics only. Some people seem to want to bring a parts bike with them.

Or just put your multi-tool under the kick stand :lol:
I'm actually thinking of machining myself a nice custom aluminum stand pad/puck. Just need to think of a design. I'm thinking maybe a Maltese cross. That's a really good trick in a pinch so long as the multi-tool inst needed.



Thanks everyone for their input. Some articles seem to recommend bringing spares of every wearing part on the bike, and others say don't bother with any preparation. It's so convoluted.

Tire repair does seem to be critical though. It's not like you can just take the spare out of the trunk.
 

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yeah i no what you meen but i just want 2 go an cruise an not have to worrie about anything like that on the road thats why i got this bike cause im going touring not so i worry all day long whatever happens happens i find!!1 plus the bike is brannew and it has a 30000mile war anty so its safe andd relyable!!

i no its not a heavy power bike but you dont know me im not too heavy . but i do wish i was a bit lighter too though. im about 260-270 lb last time i weighed myself at doctor office and thas accurate kind of scale so i no its right im not like 300 lb or anething

yes i am in good shape i work out at least onse a every week like i go walking and stuff and too i no fer sure 1000% that i can sit for a long time bcause i sit a long time at work all the time i work in a callcenter and i have to sit 8 hours or more at a time all day long at work so I know I can sit still for long periods of time. im not worried bout that at all! plus im gonna be sstoppping for gas every 600 mile or whatever so i will get even more breaks than im used to to stand up and walk around

well yes obvicuosly i cant not have tools!!!1 my bike is used so i bot it and it dint come with a tool kit but i looked online and i found what should be in it and made one myself! it wasnt even expensive i just took some of my granddads sockets and werrenches he didnt have mm sizes so i just went arond the bike and tried all the sockets on the nutz and boltz and went with the ones that fit. its not rocket science and it wasnt htat hard to do lol!!!1

i dont know what you mean tubes and spokes this is a motorcycle not just a normal bike mayhbe i didnt mention that before... im like a son of anarchy not lans armstrong i dont peddle around loll... but like i said i made a tool kit so i am definately totaly aware what is in it like familiar wize.

a tachomater tells you how fast your motor is going! its like a speedo-meater but its smaller and instread of telling you how fast you bike is going on the road it tells you how fast the motor is going. otherwise you dont know you have 2 guess!!!??

i already have rubber boots for when it rains and i have a hunting coat i use when i go hungint in the rain annd its keeps me a 1000% dry every time except my hands but i can get robber gloves for wearing on my hands when it is raining and i am waring the hunting coat plus its really really warm for the cold days even tho ill be tooring in the summer (duh!!!) plus also the coate is camoflash so when i stealth camp no one can see me thats even bettter for not getting cot!!!!!111111oneoneoneleven!

You know guy, I was responding to your questions, giving an opinion based on experience and trying to be helpful. If I insulted you or you felt talked down to or that I was being patronizing, then I apologize. What I won't apologize for is I think your response here was a real dick move and FU very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You know guy, I was responding to your questions, giving an opinion based on experience and trying to be helpful. If I insulted you or you felt talked down to or that I was being patronizing, then I apologize. What I won't apologize for is I think your response here was a real dick move and FU very much.
Easy now. Just making fun of myself in light of your reply.

I'm new to bikes, but not new to this planet. I read your reply as condescending, so I ran with it.

I apologize if I went too far. I thought you'd laugh about it actually. My bad. :oops:
 
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