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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. It's been a while since I've posted. I have a question about transporting my bike on a trailer. I plan to go to Georgia and do some riding around and I was wondering if anyone has a diagram on how to tie the bike down on the trailer and how many ties to use. I want to make sure my bike doesn't tip or anything like that. I know some of you are going to say to use a wheel lock on the front but that's not really an option for me, even though I know it's the safest way to transport. Any comments and suggetions (especially a diagram or two) would be greatly appreciated.
 

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When I've had my bike on overnight ferries, there's two ways I've done it, and both worked fine, even with raging storms on the north seas outside. I'm sure they work fine when used on a trailer too, dependant on what possibilities you have of attaching straps to it.

Put wedges on the tires so that they don't move, it's a good start.

Method one:
Strap across the seat from one side of the bike to the other, then pull it down on the shocks that way, when it is on its sidestand. Then the tension will contribute to keep it still. Tie another strap to the handlebar to keep it from swinging.

Method two:
One strap across the rear swingarm on each side of the bike, and one across the frontend on each side of the bike, hence pulling the bike down both front and back. This is the most rock-steady approach I've seen, I wasn't able to move the bike an inch.

Hope this is of any use... 8)
 

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Minimum 2 front, 2 back. There was a real good discussion on here about this a couple months ago, pictures and everything. Did you try searching?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, I shall definitely do a search on it. How much should I push down on the bike with the ties to stabilize it?
 

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Sorry, I gave you all the info I remember since I don't have a trailer. LOL
But, that was covered in that other thread also.
 

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I've been getting a lot of practice lately tying my bike down on my truck so here's what I've learned. Use four tie-down straps. Two front and two rear. Pull them down so that the springs are compressed about half way. I also put the kick stand up after I've centered the bike. Keeps it from digging into the bed of the truck. If you are going to be on a bumpy road, add bungi cords between the hooks on the straps so the bungy cord will keep the hooks from coming off the tiedown point when you hit a bump. If you don't have a channel on the trailer to hold the front wheel straight, add two more tie-down straps on the front wheel to keep it straight. Make sure the bike is anchored securely so it won't roll forward or back. This has worked great for me and I've been driving over some hellashish icy ruts. Here's a pic of the bike on the truck.



Happy Trails!

sanoke
 

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I am not sure if this helps at all but here we go. Whenever I transport my bike I always tie down in 4 spots, 2 front and two back. I also always lock the wheel in the front so it won't move side to side. If I am transporting in a truck or trailer that does not have a permanent front wheel lock I have made one out of some plywood, a 2 x 6, and some 2 x 4s. I will include a picture so you know what it looks like. Don't forget to put it in gear and pull the key out and put it in your pocket!

 

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hardy, JCW has a economy wheel chock for $14.00 Item # cay293156. These make loading bike in right spot every time. My son and I trailered a Wing and Shadow about 2500 miles useing these. Tie downs need to be in right spot every time as to balance bike. I sent Gonz a diagram of a "J" hook that works great on a wooden floor trailer, maybe he will share with you. :roll:
 

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I'm overkill but straps are cheap and can fail so I use four on the front, a pair high and a pair low and same in the back, a pair at top of shocks and a pair on swinarm. No side stand used and put in neutral to save stress on transmission.
 

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I'll share a little trick that was passed on to me by a friend after I had had a couple of bikes fall over in my trailer. I too, would pull the front suspension about half way down, thinking that this was enough tension to keep the bikes upright. But after dropping a wheel off the road trailering through the Dragon and finding my bike on it's side when I went to unload, something had to give! What I was told is so simple, I wanted to smack myself upside the head!
Place a block of wood, 4X4 or 6X6, whichever just fits under the bike's frame when the bike is stood upright, making sure it sticks out on either side a little. The tie down straps will then pull the frame down onto the block of wood, reducing the amount of tension on the front forks and the rear suspension too. I have used this set-up and haven't had a bike topple over since.
On a 750 ACE, I was able to use a 6X6 about 15" long. My lowered 1100 required a 4X4 with a piece of plywood scabbed on and a notch cut into the 4X4 for clearance of the engine. Try it, I guarantee no more toppled bikes!

Brian
 

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navillustoo said:
I'll share a little trick that was passed on to me by a friend after I had had a couple of bikes fall over in my trailer. I too, would pull the front suspension about half way down, thinking that this was enough tension to keep the bikes upright. But after dropping a wheel off the road trailering through the Dragon and finding my bike on it's side when I went to unload, something had to give! What I was told is so simple, I wanted to smack myself upside the head!
Place a block of wood, 4X4 or 6X6, whichever just fits under the bike's frame when the bike is stood upright, making sure it sticks out on either side a little. The tie down straps will then pull the frame down onto the block of wood, reducing the amount of tension on the front forks and the rear suspension too. I have used this set-up and haven't had a bike topple over since.
On a 750 ACE, I was able to use a 6X6 about 15" long. My lowered 1100 required a 4X4 with a piece of plywood scabbed on and a notch cut into the 4X4 for clearance of the engine. Try it, I guarantee no more toppled bikes!

Brian
That is a great idea!! Funny how the wisest ideas are also the cheapest and easiest!! Later Brian
 

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I use the "block o' wood" method myself, but my original purpose was to keep myself from pulling down to hard on the front forks. Reason being that if you pull down too far the tubes will bottom out and cause problems. I've also heard that its not good on seals, but not sure of the truth in that.

I use two straps up front and one across the rear seat. I welded a piece of C-channel to the front of my trailer and I used weather stripping and adhesive to pad the sharp edges of the c-channel. Bike has never fallen.

I even had a buddy use my rig and his hitch pin came out. Trailer came off of truck tilted up at a serious angle and the bike never came loose.

--BB
 

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sanoke said:
Here's a pic of the bike on the truck.



Happy Trails!

sanoke
Now that's a nice truck! (I have one myself)
Do you have any handling problems with that truck when the bike is in the back? I suspect that my truck has some weak springs, the last time I drove it with a bike in the back the ride was really scary.
 

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soupbean said:
sanoke said:
Here's a pic of the bike on the truck.

Happy Trails!

sanoke
Now that's a nice truck! (I have one myself)
Do you have any handling problems with that truck when the bike is in the back? I suspect that my truck has some weak springs, the last time I drove it with a bike in the back the ride was really scary.
No, I always make sure I've got 35lbs of air in the rear tires and I take it easy on the corners. It really gets great traction in the snow with all that weight on. I just bought a new project bike last weekend (Yamaha 550 Maxim) and trucked it home on I25. No problem cruising at 70 mph.
 

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One easy and cheap way to keep the front wheel in line is to get a couple of bags of gravel from the local Home Depot and place one on each side of the wheel. You can also use bags of gravel as chocks in front or behind the wheels to lessen front-and-back rolling tension on the tie-downs. If I don't do that when I carry a bike (or ATV) in my pickup I at least put another gravel bag between the front wheel and the front of the box to keep the wheel from banging and rubbing.
 
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