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Discussion Starter #1
I have researched this issue here on the forums and I think I have this issue narrowed down to a faulty turn signal switch. Now I do not have a test light or a multi meter so I am just going to post this and ask if you feel the switch is the likely culprit. Please try not to Roast me.

I purchased a 2006 Honda Shadow VT750DC A\A from a kid who I dont think knew what he was doing. He lived on a 4 mile dirt road and the bike was filthy! BUT with only 12k original miles and in the condition it was in, the price was right for me. He said the only issue was the turn signal didnt work on the right side. I figured no problem. He had installed one of those all in one LED brake, and turn signal jobbies for the rear fender and junked the original parts. He never replaced the turn signal relay for one that supports LED's so the working side, left side, was flashing fast. I figured maybe the right side issue was a burned out or faulty relay. I replaced the relay with a custom LED relay for LEDs and the left side works perfect now. The right side does not.

Here are the symtoms. BOTH front and rear signals on right side do not work. The switch itself is sticky and hard to move over to the right. When you do move it to the right, the right side bulb goes from constant on (running light) to off, but no blink. The rear LED does not turn on or blink at all when the switch is pushed to the right.

My gut is telling me to take apart the switch, clean it with some silicone spray and see if it works?

My other gut, yes I have two... is telling me to replace the switch with an OEM switch from the dealer and be done with it.

I realize without a multimeter or test light we cant tell if those lights are getting the proper power at all BUT does it seem like since both dont work that the fault is in the switch?
 

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A lot of turn signal circuits are surprisingly complex, like grounding the flasher through the alternate side bulbs by way of the indicator light. Often the switching is done on the GROUND side, not the power side. The flashers often rely on power drawn by the bulbs to regulate the duty cycle of the flashing, so when you switch to LEDs, all bets are off.

Personally, I'd assume that the Previous Owner's wiring is messed up, PLUS that the flasher won't work right with the LED bulbs, and perhaps the switch is broken on top of those two things.

In my opinion, there's no reason for anybody who plans to work on their machines to not have a meter or a test light. A test light is just a lamp with a couple of wires, and meters are super cheap nowadays. Less than the cost of queen size Burrito: 7 Function Digital Multimeter

Find yourself a copy of the schematic for your bike, and compare it to what the P.O. left of it. If you post the marked up schematic, we can help you diagnose it.
 

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Just for kicks > first off, Get you some electrical contact cleaner spray and squirt some into the slot in the switch housing JUST to see IF it`ll make it easier to operate and it MAY make the turns work too...
BUT You can look in the tech stickies for the trhread Switch Cleaning 101 and see IF you wanna tackle the job...
I cleaned mine back in 2007 and they`re still working...
Thanks for the reminder, I need to clean Johns VTX`s start switch,
Dennis

Welcome to the forums you two
 

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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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The way the stock turn signal indicator bulb is wired will mess up an LED turn signal install and will need rewiring with diodes.
As a quick test remove the indicator bulb and the turn signals may start to behave better ... or not.
 

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"In my opinion, there's no reason for anybody who plans to work on their machines to not have a meter or a test light. A test light is just a lamp with a couple of wires, and meters are super cheap nowadays. Less than the cost of queen size Burrito: 7 Function Digital Multimeter "
I agree, get a meter, but maybe a bit better one than this one. I had one of these with me on a trip. Headlight quit, Was getting all kinds of funny readings. like 14v with the bike off and almost 17v charging. Was worried I'd blown the rectifier and the overcharging had blown my bulb, then got suspicious and checked the AA batteries in my light, showed 2.25v out of a 1.60v max battery. Threw that "meter" in the trash. Soldered a jumper to the lowbeam to bypass my failed hi-low switch and rode the 900 miles home. (yes, I carry a butane powered soldering iron with me along with some wire and heatshrink.) $50-75 should buy a decent enough meter. (I'm now carrying my Fluke 85 with me. 29 years and counting, it's been a good meter)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
THANK YOU!! to everyone for the replies. I got a test light from my neighbor and figured out the issue. It was not in the switch, it was with the aweful wiring that the previous owner did. I re-wired the rear end of the bike, brake, tail, turn signals and everything works now. I even cleaned and checked the switch for giggles and it needed the clean out.

I am happy to say i have working lights again!
 

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Good to hear !
 

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THANK YOU!! to everyone for the replies. I got a test light from my neighbor and figured out the issue. It was not in the switch, it was with the aweful wiring that the previous owner did. I re-wired the rear end of the bike, brake, tail, turn signals and everything works now. I even cleaned and checked the switch for giggles and it needed the clean out.

I am happy to say i have working lights again!
Yeah, I didn`t make my normal comment > "Check any tapped wires you find"...

I`ve still not road tested my latest repairs, I been busy, and when I ain`t busy it`s raining...
Glad for ya,
Dennnis

EDIT: Parts stores sell meters for under $20 and it`ll give you a reading on several settings
 

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I agree, get a meter, but maybe a bit better one than this one. $50-75 should buy a decent enough meter. (I'm now carrying my Fluke 85 with me. 29 years and counting, it's been a good meter)
Even the best quality meter needs to be calibrated. For the extra $193, or more, that they charge, Fluke probably makes sure they go out the door calibrated, probably not so much on the $7 meter.

I got a Fluke multimeter too, but I wouldn't carry it on the bike, too large and too valuable. I find one of these 99 cent voltmeters with some leads soldered on, and a big glob of RTV encapsulation, 2 Wire Digital Red LED Car Voltmeter Voltage Volt Panel Meter Gauge DC 4.5-30V | eBay, plus a few clip leads, and a 1 ohm, 50 watt power resistor, to be quite adequate for diagnosis of just about anything that comes up while on the road.

In the shop, I generally prefer to use my old Simpson analog meter. Much better at showing transients than any digital meter I've ever owned. Requires constant recalibration, but they put the dial right on the front panel. $8 at the flea market, about 40 years of service, not counting the guys who owned it before me. .

I don't think Fluke makes the 85 anymore and an 87 will set you back around $300. I'm not terribly fond of the Fluke I have. It's actually a bit too feature laden for occasional use. I need to keep the manual handy, or it will just sit there with a blank screen because I'll have some setting wrong for what I'm trying to measure. There's something to be said for a simple tool that you use a lot.

The idea of recommending cheap tools, to kind of guy who needs to "borrow a test light", is in the hopes that he will acquire some piece of equipment, and more importantly, the skill to use it, for next time, instead of owning nothing, with the intention of saving up to buy the best quality.
 

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Even the best quality meter needs to be calibrated. For the extra $193, or more, that they charge, Fluke probably makes sure they go out the door calibrated, probably not so much on the $7 meter.

I got a Fluke multimeter too, but I wouldn't carry it on the bike, too large and too valuable. I find one of these 99 cent voltmeters with some leads soldered on, and a big glob of RTV encapsulation, 2 Wire Digital Red LED Car Voltmeter Voltage Volt Panel Meter Gauge DC 4.5-30V | eBay, plus a few clip leads, and a 1 ohm, 50 watt power resistor, to be quite adequate for diagnosis of just about anything that comes up while on the road.

In the shop, I generally prefer to use my old Simpson analog meter. Much better at showing transients than any digital meter I've ever owned. Requires constant recalibration, but they put the dial right on the front panel. $8 at the flea market, about 40 years of service, not counting the guys who owned it before me. .

I don't think Fluke makes the 85 anymore and an 87 will set you back around $300. I'm not terribly fond of the Fluke I have. It's actually a bit too feature laden for occasional use. I need to keep the manual handy, or it will just sit there with a blank screen because I'll have some setting wrong for what I'm trying to measure. There's something to be said for a simple tool that you use a lot.

The idea of recommending cheap tools, to kind of guy who needs to "borrow a test light", is in the hopes that he will acquire some piece of equipment, and more importantly, the skill to use it, for next time, instead of owning nothing, with the intention of saving up to buy the best quality.
We had several (expensive) meters when I grew up in the TV shop in use every day, and I ain`t never bought one of the expensive ones for myself...
I ain`t using it everyday, so I buy the "On Sale" ones,
Dennis

<$20 sure beats $200 for a meter I use once in a while
 

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Even the best quality meter needs to be calibrated. For the extra $193, or more, that they charge, Fluke probably makes sure they go out the door calibrated, probably not so much on the $7 meter.

I got a Fluke multimeter too, but I wouldn't carry it on the bike, too large and too valuable. I find one of these 99 cent voltmeters with some leads soldered on, and a big glob of RTV encapsulation, 2 Wire Digital Red LED Car Voltmeter Voltage Volt Panel Meter Gauge DC 4.5-30V | eBay, plus a few clip leads, and a 1 ohm, 50 watt power resistor, to be quite adequate for diagnosis of just about anything that comes up while on the road.
In the shop, I generally prefer to use my old Simpson analog meter. Much better at showing transients than any digital meter I've ever owned. Requires constant recalibration, but they put the dial right on the front panel. $8 at the flea market, about 40 years of service, not counting the guys who owned it before me. .

I don't think Fluke makes the 85 anymore and an 87 will set you back around $300. I'm not terribly fond of the Fluke I have. It's actually a bit too feature laden for occasional use. I need to keep the manual handy, or it will just sit there with a blank screen because I'll have some setting wrong for what I'm trying to measure. There's something to be said for a simple tool that you use a lot.

The idea of recommending cheap tools, to kind of guy who needs to "borrow a test light", is in the hopes that he will acquire some piece of equipment, and more importantly, the skill to use it, for next time, instead of owning nothing, with the intention of saving up to buy the best quality.
[/QUOTE]

Mine needs calibrated, ohms is off by 0.3 voltage by a few hundredths. It's sixty bucks + shipping both ways. Couldn't see spending possibly a hundred on a 30 year old meter. Picked up a new 85 model III at a closeout price.for shop use instead, Compared the 2. Now it's like the old saying: man with one clock knows what time it is, man with two clocks never sure... ;)

That small meter is a good idea, I may have to put something like that together. . We are working on trimming down the packing list. Something like this would help towards ditching the trailer..

I agree on someone with none not needing to spend a lot, but the really cheap unacceptably inaccurate one may just make his experience worse. A better quality used one may be a better deal long term. Look at your deal.on the Simpson.
 

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Analog is better for precision readings, but digital is good for quick voltage reads and is forgiving when you accidently hook it up backwards.
I have bent a few analog needles in my time o_O
 
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