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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had an idea that it might be a good thing to turn The petcock valve (fuel shutoff valve) off about a 1/4 mile before you park the bike. This will drain the float bowl and keep the gas from corroding it, especially if you're not going to ride for a while. It doesn't take very long for your bike to start to bog once the valve is off. Thoughts?

Of course you still want to use Starbrite, SeaFoam or Bell stabilzer. I stabilize even when I ride every day or several times per week.
 

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I had an idea that it might be a good thing to turn The petcock valve (fuel shutoff valve) off about a 1/4 mile before you park the bike. This will drain the float bowl and keep the gas from corroding it, especially if you're not going to ride for a while. It doesn't take very long for your bike to start to bog once the valve is off. Thoughts?

Of course you still want to use Starbrite, SeaFoam or Bell stabilzer. I stabilize even when I ride every day or several times per week.
Save your time and effort. Gas doesn't corrode your carb. If you're going to store your bike for an extended period, go through regular storage procedures and be done with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Smilie,
I wonder when it's riding season, how many riders add stabilzer to every tank full? The last several years I put some in everytime I fill up during riding season. Of course the rthanol subject has been beat to death.
:lol:
 

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I doubt many do. There's no real reason to do so and it's a waste of good "Honda bucks".
 

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For what it's worth, if I know it's going to be an extended period before I ride again I do close the valve and let the engine run dry. A habit I got into with outboard motors and the problems I had when I bought a 79 Wing which had been stored a long time with fuel in the carbs. I believe ethanol adds another dimension to the equation, why run the carburetor dry and leave the gasoline in the tank? When I go to start the bike again I'll reopen the petcock and let the same old gas back in. I guess this is another argument for using a stabilizer additive in everything. Makes me think about that tiller in storage I forgot about.
 

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Smilie,
I wonder when it's riding season, how many riders add stabilzer to every tank full? The last several years I put some in everytime I fill up during riding season. Of course the rthanol subject has been beat to death.
:lol:
I could use a good laugh.

What exactly, do you imagine the benefit of adding all of this fuel stabilizer to your gas, to be? Besides, of course, adding to the profits of the folks who make these potions....
 

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Benn riding for 40 plus years, never used any kind of stabailer or worried about the petcock, but then again I ride daily year round
 

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I had an idea that it might be a good thing to turn The petcock valve (fuel shutoff valve) off about a 1/4 mile before you park the bike. This will drain the float bowl and keep the gas from corroding it, especially if you're not going to ride for a while. It doesn't take very long for your bike to start to bog once the valve is off. Thoughts?

Of course you still want to use Starbrite, SeaFoam or Bell stabilzer. I stabilize even when I ride every day or several times per week.
My 2006 vlx has never had the petcock turned off ever. I bought it new with one mile on it and now have well over 67,000. My carb has never been touched, gas hasn't hurt it one bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi gat803,
I wonder what you know that most don't. Not being an ass to you though. Why does the marine industry and motorcycle & small engine industry use stabilizer so much, especially when we put our engines up for the winter.

I'm also an Ultralight pilot and some of the engines we use, the companies void the warranty if you use ethonol gas. Please educate us with your knowlege that I may be over looking. Please use facts and not just hearsay. Again, not trying to be rude, just want knowledge as maybe I'm doing something wrong with my engines.
 

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My petcock will NOT shut off fuel flow, as many here have experienced this faulty petcock...
I`m Not a regular to additives, BUT =>
Recently bought a Husqvarna Chainsaw...
They warranty it for 1 year, however will extend that warranty to two (or three?) IF I use ONLY their fuel???
How do they know what fuel I use???

I only add these magic potions IF I`m attempting to clean a system...
Then am doubtful of results ;)

Good Luck,
Dennis
 

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I agree with Smilie. No need to worry about the carbs during the season. What I do is when the weather gets really cold/bad and I am not sure when I might have to shut down operations at a moments notice is to run Seafoam laced gas until it's time for her to go to sleep. Works for me ...
I will always keep a can of Seafoam stocked from now on I think, as a "just in case". But I use my bike all year round as it's my only wheels, gonna keep a can handy anyway.
 

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Hi gat803,
I wonder what you know that most don't. Not being an ass to you though. Why does the marine industry and motorcycle & small engine industry use stabilizer so much, especially when we put our engines up for the winter.

I'm also an Ultralight pilot and some of the engines we use, the companies void the warranty if you use ethonol gas. Please educate us with your knowlege that I may be over looking. Please use facts and not just hearsay. Again, not trying to be rude, just want knowledge as maybe I'm doing something wrong with my engines.
Of the few times i 'stored' my 750 in my friends garage the ONLY two things i did to it after riding to his house were:
1. Plugged in the Tender Jr.
2. Turned off the petcock.

The longest it sat was almost 6 months, and it had the same gas in it the whole time. Took less than a minute to get it to crank over and i rode it home. I emptied the tank by driving it and filled it back up. Ive never used any additive when it sat any length of time. Over my ownership of 26,000+ miles, i never experienced any degradation of performance from doing this.

So his point of blasting stabilizers is, for the most part, its completely pointless to use them.
 

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Please ..for the love of all that is decent don't kill your engine.. what did it ever do to deserve such a violent demise?
 

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I had an idea that it might be a good thing to turn The petcock valve (fuel shutoff valve) off about a 1/4 mile before you park the bike. This will drain the float bowl and keep the gas from corroding it, especially if you're not going to ride for a while. It doesn't take very long for your bike to start to bog once the valve is off. Thoughts?

Of course you still want to use Starbrite, SeaFoam or Bell stabilzer. I stabilize even when I ride every day or several times per week.
I would consider that an unsafe and unnecessary move. Put yourself in this situation: you turned your petcock off and you encounter a situation that requires you to crank the throttle to get out of harms way. OOPs you don't have enough gas left for that extra demand and then............:sad:

If you want to drain the carb bowls if your bike is going to sit 6 months or more, then run them dry after the bike is in it's storage spot. I don't use a fuel stabilizer during our riding season here in MN. It gets ridden enough to prevent the ethanol gas from attracting moisture and the carbs from gumming up. During the middle of the riding season I might add 3 oz of B12 to the tank as a preventive measure. ;)
 

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Hi gat803,
I wonder what you know that most don't. Not being an ass to you though. Why does the marine industry and motorcycle & small engine industry use stabilizer so much, especially when we put our engines up for the winter.

I'm also an Ultralight pilot and some of the engines we use, the companies void the warranty if you use ethonol gas. Please educate us with your knowlege that I may be over looking. Please use facts and not just hearsay. Again, not trying to be rude, just want knowledge as maybe I'm doing something wrong with my engines.
So his point of blasting stabilizers is, for the most part, its completely pointless to use them.
I never once said fuel stabilizers weren't a good or useful thing.

You want facts....then offer some. Meanwhile, here are a few...

Fact. Millions of engines run just fine on 10% ethanol doped gasoline.
Fact. These same engines run just fine without any type of aftermarket additive in the gas.
Fact. Ethanol laced fuel will store with no adverse effects for at least a month or so.

Myth. Ethanol gas is the Devil.
Myth. Ethanol fuel will destroy your fuel system.
Myth. Most people know that ethanol gas is bad for fuel systems.
Myth. Running fuel stabilizer in every tank of gas is beneficial in some way.

I can back up my few (though I could come up with many more) facts, by simple observation. Look around. Lots of power toys running very well with no great uptake in sales of stabilizers. We can surmise this because we're not ass deep in empty fuel stabilizer containers.

While you could call it hearsay, lots of people relate their experience with un-stabilized fuel burning jst fine in whatever toy they take out of off season storage.

As far as my personal experience....I've been building fast power sports engines, and prepping/storing off season toys for over 40 years in the not so fuel friendly conditions of Michigan. Motorcycles/boats/snowmobiles/sand rails/quads/three wheelers, and all of the common yard equipment/weed wackers/chain saws/snow blowers/roto-tillers/etc that use ICE.

It has been my experience that daily dosing of fuel is a waste of time and money. I've seen guys do it, and not once could anyone ever show that it did any good. Or rather that it did anything other than make their user "feel" better.

The simple fact is....gasoline and methanol are, in themselves, fairly strong solvents. This means that they are doing a decent job of keeping the crud out of your fuel tract all by them selves.

The problem shows up when this fuel is allowed to sit for extensive periods. What's extensive? General consensus amongst those with knowledge that I've spoken with (and my own experience) says most times more than six weeks. This is, incidently, just about the same time that it takes for most/all of the gas to evaporate out of your carburetor.
I've spent a lot of time (and made some good money) cleaning carbs for people that leave things sit too long. When pressed, the usual response is "Well, I didn't run the (insert toy of your choice, here) at all last year"....

I love gas stabilizer. A few years ago put a very heavy dose of Stabil in a snowmobile with half a tank (steel tank) of 10% ethanol gas and then put it on a shelf for three years. When we finally took it of the rack it started in about five pulls and we ran that fuel tank dry. It ran perfect.

All of my stored engines get stabilized. I count storage as unused longer than a month. I suggest the same rule of thumb to my friends/customers. No one who uses this method has reported a problem.

You want to use an additive with every tank of gas....it's your money and your engine. My opinion remains. It carries no benefit, other than in your mind....
 

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I never once said fuel stabilizers weren't a good or useful thing.

My opinion remains. It carries no benefit, other than in your mind....
No, you didnt, but ^^^ you said that again, thats what i was going off of.
 

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Hi gat803,
I wonder what you know that most don't. Not being an ass to you though. Why does the marine industry and motorcycle & small engine industry use stabilizer so much, especially when we put our engines up for the winter.

I'm also an Ultralight pilot and some of the engines we use, the companies void the warranty if you use ethonol gas. Please educate us with your knowlege that I may be over looking. Please use facts and not just hearsay. Again, not trying to be rude, just want knowledge as maybe I'm doing something wrong with my engines.
I would like to see a warranty that specifically states that it's void if ethanol is used. In the Chicago area we've had ethanol since day one and myself nor anyone else that I know has ever had any problems with it that I know of. Just another of those myths that have never been proven.
 
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