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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everybody!

Never posted before, just been lurking and learning...

I'm riding a 2006 VT750, love it!

Now I have a question thats concerning me:

Spilled some fuel on the tank while filling up and the wife thought she was helpful by immediately rinsing it off with the watercan, except the fuel cap wasn't on yet :oops: , so some water got into the tank.

:sad:

advice please!
 

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Pull the tank now, unscrew the fuel petcock, then go kill some unwanted weeds with the contents of the tank. Just a few drops of water can gald the cylinder walls. Better save than sorry.

Make sure you brace the front end from moving while removing and replacing the tank. I got a nasty chip in the paint first time I replaced my tank. Handle bars flipped around unexpectedly.
 

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advice please!

Find a new wife. This one is too dumb. :wink:


Actually, it all depends on how much water got into the tank. Anything less than half an ounce, just add some fuel line dryer to the next few tanks and ride as usual. More than that and you need to be draining and flushing the tank.
 

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gat803 is more than likely right. I'm sure your wife didn't just stick the hose down in there. I just have lots of unwanted weeds.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice guys

She didn't use a hose, just a plastic watering can, and she was quickly rinsing off the fuel from the whole bike, so I don't think much got into the tank.

Now correct me if I'm wrong, but I think if any water got in, it would have gone to the bottom of the tank, fuel being lighter than water, right? so if I keep the tank full the bike won't suck up what little water got in. I'm going to see if I can get some "fuel line dryer" and use that. Can you explain what exactly that is: I'm in New Zealand and I've never heard of it (maybe we call it something else)

thanks again!
 

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wander around in your auto parts store and look at the gas additives. Somewhere mixed in with the octane boosters you'll find water removers, dehydrators, or whatever they call it down there.
 

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It's really not a big deal.

Disconnect the hose from the petcock and drain your tank.

Put in a couple of ounces of isopropyl alcohol, fill up tank with gas and ride :-D

BTW.... the gas pickup tube in your tank takes gas from the bottom so any water, which would gather on the bottom would be first to go through the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's really not a big deal.

Disconnect the hose from the petcock and drain your tank.

Put in a couple of ounces of isopropyl alcohol, fill up tank with gas and ride :-D

BTW.... the gas pickup tube in your tank takes gas from the bottom so any water, which would gather on the bottom would be first to go through the system.
I tried just disconnecting the hose and opening the petcock, but only a little bit came out then it stopped, even with the tap turned onto reserve (the tank is full). I suspect the bike has to be running for fuel to flow (some kind of vacuum lock system I suppose?)

As to the gas pickup: I thought that the pickup with the tap on ON is higher than RESERVE, so if I ride without switching to reserve it won't use whats on the bottom of the tank?
 

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I tried just disconnecting the hose and opening the petcock, but only a little bit came out then it stopped, even with the tap turned onto reserve (the tank is full). I suspect the bike has to be running for fuel to flow (some kind of vacuum lock system I suppose?)

As to the gas pickup: I thought that the pickup with the tap on ON is higher than RESERVE, so if I ride without switching to reserve it won't use whats on the bottom of the tank?


You're pretty much right on every count.
Because of the design of motorcycle petcocks it is almost impossible to get every last drop of fuel out of your tank, even on reserve there will still be a few ounces of gas left. So, if there is only a small amount of water in the bottom of your tank, it isn't coming thru the petcock by pulling the hose and letting it drain. If you want to drain ALL of the liquid from the tank, you must remove the petcock.

Fuel line dryer is mostly what we use up here in the great white north to keep the water out of our fuel lines in the winter. Water in fuel lines is prone to freeze in sub-zero temperatures, and when that happens you've got a problem.

Isopropyl alcohol is the main ingredient in fuel line dryer. The alcohol picks up the water as it move thru your fuel system and allows it to be burned with the gasoline and then expelled out of the exhaust harmlessly.

This is really not that big of a deal. I fill up the gas tanks on snowmobiles, quads, boats, and dirt bikes in everything from pouring thunderstorms to driving snowstorms, and I watch lots of water go in with the gas. A little alcohol now and again, and it's no problem. ;)
 

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I would think that most likely very little water got in the gas, buy some StaBil or SeaFoam and put in the recomended amount and run a couple of tanks and should be just fine................Also give the wife a big hug and thank her for helping you out.........she will appreciate it.............
 
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