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One reason for higher octane is to control detonation in higher compression engines. The premium burns just a bit slower so it doesn't explode ( out of control detonation) but is more of a controlled burn. Maybe it can cause an engine to run a little bit cooler because of the lower burn speed and temperature. I never thought of that.
 

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The premium I use IS ethanol free. There's a sticker right on the pump. They can't put it there unless it's true without being heavily fined by the weights and measures commission.
 

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What does your owners manual say to run?

I ran 91 in my 750 and when I got my VTX I was using it in that too. I did some reading and many owners reported that the 87 was better for the bike. I tried it and honestly the bike ran smoother and seemed to have less heat coming off the pipe.

As I live in Canada and have to put the bike up for a few months, I start running 91 when I’m close to storage time. Usually the last 2 fill ups. I do this because the 91 is ethanol free.

The ethanol in the 87 won’t hurt the bike as long as you are running it through. It’s bad when it sits for long periods.


Sitting on my VTX making Vroom Vroom noises.
I'll Never store my bike with Ethanol Has in it.
 

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You're lucky. I have a friend that ships International Scout parts all over the world. He showed me how ethanol ate the bottoms of the factory brass floats right out, as if they were sitting in acid. Ethanol gas leaves a brown sticky substance in the carbs and tank unless you use stabil or seafoam.
 

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You're lucky. I have a friend that ships International Scout parts all over the world. He showed me how ethanol ate the bottoms of the factory brass floats right out, as if they were sitting in acid. Ethanol gas leaves a brown sticky substance in the carbs and tank unless you use stabil or seafoam.
So if I use Stabil or Seafoam, all is good and I can continue using ethanol gas then with no worries?
 

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The problem here is that gasoline is a blend of different hydrocarbons and different states here in the U.S. have different blends of gasoline. My ethanol gasoline in my state is different from your ethanol gasoline in your state.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Thanks for your responses everyone! I'll be sure to put 87 on my first fill up!

(And try not to get gas all over me or my tank lol)
 

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Ethanol is **** fuel. The only reason its being added to our gas is to support corn farmers who were hurt financially when the world figured out that high fructose corn syrup is poison. Hence why it is blended in our gas and no run straight through your engine. However, by 2013 everything on the market was designed to burn ethanol blends so youre probably safe there. I wouldnt leave it in the tank for storage though because ethanol attracts water
 

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I wouldnt leave it in the tank for storage though because ethanol attracts water
"attracts" water is slightly misleading. The ethanol will absorb water that is in its environment ie the fuel tank. The available water would include condensation and any moisture in the air in the tank (miniscule). With E10 the ethanol will hold about a shot glass of water. That much water could only be introduced by leaving the fuel cap off.

E10 absorbing water is actually a good thing because otherwise that water is sitting at the bottom of your tank. If you really want to avoid any water in the tank use E10 and fill the tank during storage so no room for condensation and make sure you put your gas cap on.

G.
 

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[QUOTE="swifty2014, post: 5494180, member: 175657" it can cause an engine to run a little bit cooler because of the lower burn speed and temperature. I never thought of that.
[/QUOTE]

A higher octane fuel may be produced that contains a higher or lower BTU rating than a lower octane but the BTU or heat value is not determined by octane rating. In most cases the difference in BTU ratings of 87 and 91 will be negligible as will be the effect especially in a water-cooled engine running at varying rpm.

G.
 

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They'll run on 87, but the higher the octane, the cooler they run. try to avoid ethanol enriched gas.
Ethanol has about 76,000 BTU/gal, so in theory, E10 gasoline should burn 'cooler' than pure gasoline at 119,000 BTUs/gal.

Try the Tech section and read the thread "Fuelology". Clears up many misconceptions and you can research on your own to verify the information. Pretty basic / standard stuff.

 

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The 800 dollar repair bill was due to the PO letting ethanol sit in the bike. It destroyed the diaphragms (shredded them) as well as the fuel pump. I tried putting aftermarket diaphragms in, but they wouldn't seat properly because the were folded over in the package.Ethanol goes bad in a couple of months, whereas pure gasoline lasts years,.
Most of the info on ethanol points to a 90 to 100 day window before it breaks down into harmful chemicals in your gas tank or storage container. Pure gasoline looks to last about a year before it starts to get cloudy. Adding Stabil or other similar additives help mitigate this breakdown in ethanol blended and pure gasoline. Manufacturers started making engines and fuel systems ethanol friendly at some point, but I don't recall the exact year(s) when that transition started, and that doesn't help those of us with 'older' bikes.
 

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So if I use Stabil or Seafoam, all is good and I can continue using ethanol gas then with no worries?
I have mixed feeling about StaBil.... I use it; but I use about 1/2 of the recommended dose. At full strength it tends to foul spark-plugs when you bring it out of storage. I've been doing the half dose for years in my motorcycle as well as all my other gas powered tools, the fuel still stays fresh and the spark-plugs aren't prone to fouling.
Phil
 

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I have mixed feeling about StaBil.... I use it; but I use about 1/2 of the recommended dose. At full strength it tends to foul spark-plugs when you bring it out of storage. I've been doing the half dose for years in my motorcycle as well as all my other gas powered tools, the fuel still stays fresh and the spark-plugs aren't prone to fouling.
Phil
The half dose is a good tip. Hadn't noticed any issues with the full, (or over), dosing, but if a half dose works, the bottle will last twice as long!
 

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The half dose is a good tip. Hadn't noticed any issues with the full, (or over), dosing, but if a half dose works, the bottle will last twice as long!
Honestly if your bike is only down for 3-4 months for winter and in a garage that doesn't see much below freezing temps you don't even need to use Stabil, it's only an insurance for long term storage of over a year to keep the gas from going rotten over time, it's good for piece of mind but if you're running quality gas from a station that gets a lot of fuel stops you're fine to let a full tank sit over winter for 3-4 months, nothing will happen to it. Just be sure it's as full as possible to limit the amount of air in the tank. :)

That being said, I only fill my 750 with 91 Octane Ethanol free since the carbs are tuned for it, have never had an issue with gas going bad over the winter in my garage. Stabil for short term storage is really just a warm feeling you get that you did something extra, and unless you plan on storing for over a year...it's just money you don't need to spend. Gas at some stations can sit in underground tanks for up 2-3 months easily, with low volume stations it can be even more, you can bet they're not using Stabil in those.
 

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Honestly if your bike is only down for 3-4 months for winter and in a garage that doesn't see much below freezing temps you don't even need to use Stabil, it's only an insurance for long term storage of over a year to keep the gas from going rotten over time, it's good for piece of mind but if you're running quality gas from a station that gets a lot of fuel stops you're fine to let a full tank sit over winter for 3-4 months, nothing will happen to it. Just be sure it's as full as possible to limit the amount of air in the tank. :)

That being said, I only fill my 750 with 91 Octane Ethanol free since the carbs are tuned for it, have never had an issue with gas going bad over the winter in my garage. Stabil for short term storage is really just a warm feeling you get that you did something extra, and unless you plan on storing for over a year...it's just money you don't need to spend. Gas at some stations can sit in underground tanks for up 2-3 months easily, with low volume stations it can be even more, you can bet they're not using Stabil in those.
I have to respectfuly disagree about the need for some sort of additive for storage of ethanol laced fuel. I have read too many articles that all point to 90 to 100 days before the fuel starts to breakdown. With ethanol free, I agree about the longer time period of 'freshness' for lack of a better term. It's best to ride when there is even the smallest window of opportunity, but my old ass chills too quickly anymore.
 

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In 92, I parked my cb750c in late november and got it out in early march. All 4 carbs were gummed up due to ethanol. It was a new idea at the time, and nobody knew what it did. It's JUNK
 

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Honestly if your bike is only down for 3-4 months for winter and in a garage that doesn't see much below freezing temps you don't even need to use Stabil, it's only an insurance for long term storage...
Gas at some stations can sit in underground tanks for up 2-3 months easily, with low volume stations...
I agree that for short term storage 3-4 months, you likely don't need a fuel stabilizer, however many of us store bikes for longer periods. I have several vehicles that get stored for between 7 and 8 months. The cost of dosing my VT1100C2 with Stabil for up to a year is $2 so its a fairly inexpensive insurance.

The 2 main problems with seasonal storage of gas in the tank are oxidation causing gumming and the lowering of octane rating as the lighter hydrocarbons evaporate. A fuel stabilizer will reduce the oxidation. As mentioned I have been using E10 for the entire life of my 1995 VT1100C2 and it has been stored 7 months a year for 24 years with no fuel/carb issues and the engine starts well every April/May.

What I do for storage is take the vehicle and the $2 of stabilizer to a Top Tier gas station. Dump in the stabilizer, fill the tank and ride home. My trip home is a quarter mile but if farther I would take a spare tank to be used to top up at home. I usually use 87 E10, however for storage I fill with 91 E10. That way I have no concerns about reduced octane, oxidation or moisture from condensation. Coming out of storage I use up about half the tank and then top up with 89 E10 after which its back to 87.

As far as gas sitting in the UST (underground storage tank): most stations/c-stores tanks are sized based on traffic patterns so that the UST will need refilling within a week unless in an extremely remote area or normal traffic has been disrupted ie street paving etc.

G.
 
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