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Gentlemen,
I do not own a Torque Wrench. What I have is 3 1984 Magnas. I understand there are a variety of different types of torque wrenches out there. Please point me to what exact one/s that would be the most beneficial for this type of bike. I know the manuals have the specs in Newton Meters but understand some just use conversion charts. I am not one for electronic stuff unless someone convinces me it is the way to go. I mentioned this querie to my bike builder but feel guilty about annoying him with this type of thing, yet I would like to hear from people who use these things regularly. The one story I read about on the net told me to A. stay away from Sears and Snap-on for different reasons. I am a firm believer in measuring twice and cutting once, in other words, doing a lot of research before buying something that is costly. I don't mind paying a few extra bucks for insurance that I have a quality tool. It's not that I am rich, but rather that I feel halfstepping is often worse than not buying anything. It is a waste of money. I know J&P and Whitney and the like offer wrenches in the fifty and less dollar ranges and for starters I'm betting you will say to stay away from these. As I said, I would appreciate it if you would be specific. Thanks, 3 Mag
 

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3 Mag Night said:
I know the manuals have the specs in Newton Meters but understand some just use conversion charts.
Most shop manuals, especially factory ones, will show the values
in Newton meters and ft or inch pounds.

3 Mag Night said:
I am not one for electronic stuff unless someone convinces me it is the way to go.
Nothing wrong with electronic measuring devices. They are usually more
expensive than a standard beam or clicker, but they are just as good,
depending on which one you choose. Like anything else,
you get what you pay for and research is key.

3 Mag Night said:
The one story I read about on the net told me to A. stay away from Sears and Snap-on for different reasons.
Not sure what you read that told you this, but there is absolutely nothing
wrong with either of them.
The Snap-On units are going to be much more expensive and generally
better quality and will hold calibration better.
The Sears Craftsman units are fine units. They will have a slightly
higher margin of error than the more expensive Snap-On, Mac, Matco
units... but they cost 1/3 the price also.
The Sears unit are perfectly fine for most home owner uses and
will be absolutely fine for anything you will do on your bike.
Husky and Cobalt (Home Depot and Lowes) wrenches are also good wrenches.

3 Mag Night said:
I know J&P and Whitney and the like offer wrenches in the fifty and less dollar ranges and for starters I'm betting you will say to stay away from these.
Well, I would not buy a precision measuring device of any sorts from either
one of those places. They may sell a decent wrench, they may not.
However, if something happens to the wrench, how are you going to get
it serviced?
Snap-on, find a tool truck and get it fixed.
Sears, take it in and get it replaced.
Home Depot or Lowes, take it in and get it replaced.
J&P and Whitney? Send it off and wait.


Here's a couple of threads that have been discussed in the past
about torque wrenches.
Myself and a couple of others who use these things on a daily basis have
given input in length about torque wrenches in these threads and
it might be of use to you.

If you have any specific questions, don't be afraid to ask!

http://www.hondashadow.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=33610&highlight=torque+wrench

http://www.hondashadow.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=27646&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=torque+wrench
 
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People, including myself, are so interesting and funny at times. I got a charge out of many of the posts, made in the past, on this subject. I might be out 180 degrees but like many cars, somehow I still run. Because of things like vibration, stress, etc., I think it is important to torque many bolts to spec. expecially things like head bolts, bearing caps, starters etc. Perhaps bikes have a little more vibration than cars which I would not use a torque wrench for a starter or alternator and the like. Funniest one, I think, and here again I am not saying they are wrong, just that what was said struck me funny; was the one where the guy says he doesn't use a torque wrench at all, implying that we worry too much or something like that. Actually I agree, people like me do worry too much. The things I thought would be important weren't mentioned in most of the posts I read. Some have flexible heads, however I believe they lose a little accuracy, expecially if the change in angle is really great. Length of handle and size of square piece that goes in the socket. Probably for some applications, a 1/2" drive would have thicker walls and not work. I'm thinking 3/8" would be the best for most stuff and maybe 1/2 for stuff like axles. At one point my research led me to Snap-on and a 3/8" drive but I was still unsure as to flex or no flex head. The range was maybe from 5ft. lb. to 75ft. lbs.. I don't recall exactly so I guess it is back to the book and I will hope to hear from one more person. Thanks for all of your help. I wish I were more like some of the guys who have no problem choosing. Looks like it will be electronic. There is one that backs itself off when done and it makes it easier to reset or use again. This is really a great place!
 

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It's always good to "think thru" the process no matter what one is working on....car or bike. But you are correct about the "vibration issue" with a motorcycle. Nature of the beast...less wheels, less weight, more exposed components just for starters.

As "litnin" explained, buy what YOU want and can afford. :wink:

To let you know...."litnin" IS one of the best on the board. Knows his stuff as they say.

Here's a website that may be of help to you: www.v4hondabbs.com
It's mostly for the Sabre models of the V-45/V-65 but the motors are nearly the same for components. Frames are different. But many on this board own/operate Magnas.


Had another but not sure if it's still working. I'll check it out.

Bullzeyet
 
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Torque Wrench

Bullseyet,
That name caught my eye and I'll tell you why in a minute, but before I do, let me say "I didn't feel like anyone was a dummy." What I found interesting was that I was so dumb that I thought at least a couple of people would say "Buy a Model #35478. This one covers ninety nine percent of the nuts and bolts. Wait for a sale and buy model so and so for the remaining bolts. It goes on sale usually for 79.00 or less a couple of times a year". What I got was mostly non-specifics which shows what a nut case I must be, LOL. Anyway I decided to try and find this one torque wrench in the Snap-on catalog, partly because I still have a 50.00 gift certificate that was given to me by my daughter. What was cool about the posts was that everybody seemed content with their choices and they varied like night varies from day. Thanks for the reply. If you find that other place where you think this subject might be addressed, I would appreciate hearing from you. What is even more funny is I can barely use my arms without really messing them up and my son does not like to get dirty. Guess what? I never owned one but have used a clicker type before building stock car engines with my surrogate dad, so I'm going to buy one for GP. Oh yeah, back to the name lightning. When I was a young Marine and going through Specialist Training at Camp Stone Bay, there was this really shrude guy ( I am not saying the lightning here is even a little bit like him. It just brought back memories) Lightning was so named because he was a thief and he never struck the same place twice. He bought up all the pogie bait and resold it for 2 or 3 bucks a piece. Thankfully there will never be a one quite like him.
 

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3 Mag Night,

I also torque most all the fasteners. They have torque specs
for a reason and I tend to follow them.
However, I've been doing this long enough, I can tell within a couple
of ft/lbs of being in spec without using one..
There are some places, like oil drain bolts, where I don't feel it that much
of a necessity to use a torque wrench. Head bolts, mains, flywheel, etc, absolutely. Anything thing that has potential to warp, absolutely.

A lot of it depends on the application and a lot depends on how comfortable
you are knowing "that feel".

On the flex head torque wrenches, I personally don't care for them.
The flex head is fine if you are just snugging up a bolt, but when
measuring torque, that is a point for energy loss. I don't care for flex
head wrenches of any type though. The head of the wrench is going to
click when the torque value is reached, so the flex head isn't going to
throw the torque reading off. I'd had people tell me not to use
handle extensions on a torque wrench because it will throw it off.
Not true. Some people hear things about them and don't really know what
they heard. Socket extensions will throw one off, not handle extensions.
Same with a flex head. The amount of torque being applied to the head
will make it click in the same spot. However, it will cause you to exert
more energy as the flex head will absorb some of that energy.
And what I really hate about them is if you are torquing something and
that flex head slips, it can make for a real painful set of fingers or arm.
Otherwise, they work just as good and are just as accurate as a straight
head wrench.

On the 3/8" and 1/2" situation, if you can afford it, buy both.
There's always going to be a time when the 3/8" drive won't go high
enough to torque something to proper specs and the 1/2" drive won't
fit. I have both and use them both just as often as each other.
Many 3/8" drives are in inch pounds, instead of ft/lbs. So, it takes a little
calculation to use, but it's not that bad. Some of the more expensive ones
read in ft/lbs, but many of the less expensive ones are just inch pounds.

I'm guessing it was a military thing.
That definitely wasn't me, because I can assure you,
I don't even know what a pogie bait is! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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3 Mag Night,

I agree with all that "litnin" says about the torque wrenchs. He oughta know...he's a "wrench" on a "Pro" drag race car. :shock: 8)

Found the other site for you: www.sabmag.org
I wasn't sure if it still was online...but it's there. There is a lot of info on this site so take your time reading it. Don't hesitate to contact some of the people there...they are a big help. :wink:

I had 2 Sabre's a few years ago (700cc Sabre (downsized V-45)and V-65) and they both were great bikes. Kinda liked the 700 a little better overall. Nothing wrong with the Magna's, just didn't suit my "style" of riding. :shock: :lol: Like to get another one (700) but the wifey might get a little upset.......the garage is nearly full now.

Bullzeyet
 
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BullZeyet,
Pogy or Pokie Bait is candy, like snickers bars and the like. As a recruit a Marine is not allowed such stuff, but after PI, it is available if you know where to look and have the free time to get it. I remember this guy Lightning, who was ripping his fellow marines off by buying out the candy machines, (candy was five or ten cents for a full size bar) and selliing them to his fellow marines for a huge huge profit. They would buy from him because he was the only source. LOL. It takes all kinds.
Now I get it. Lightnin like in really fast cars. Bull, what you said about handle extensions makes perfectly good sense to me. I'm gonna go back and reread lightnin's posts on the subject. Have you actually used the torque flex head wrench or was it a ratchet with a flex head? I had the same experiences with plain ratchets with flex head. I've heard some claim they really liked the flex feature because you can reach stuff you otherwise could not. I think I will stay away from the flex though.
Regarding the 700 vs. the 750: I know folks who have them and most lean toward the 750. Having had no personal experience, the jury is still out on that one.
Thanks Bull.
Respectfully,
3 Mag Night
 

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3 Mag Night said:
what you said about handle extensions makes perfectly good sense to me.
Yeah, some people have heard that you shouldn't use extensions and
they automatically think handle extensions.

3 Mag Night said:
Have you actually used the torque flex head wrench or was it a ratchet with a flex head? I had the same experiences with plain ratchets with flex head. I've heard some claim they really liked the flex feature because you can reach stuff you otherwise could not. I think I will stay away from the flex though.
Yep, I have one in the tool box and I have busted my knuckles with it
more times than I can count. It doesn't get used much.
Flex head wrenches are ok, but I've run in to the same problem.
If you are just running something up, they are ok, but if you try to tighten
something up with them and get off center, you're gonna bust a knuckle.

I'm sure there are situations where they have a good purpose,
but for myself, I have other wrenches or tools that allow me to do the
same thing and are more safe to use.
 

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Does anyone have any experience with this torque wrench? Thinking of going in with some friends and buying one for us all to use. Can't find any information on this electronic wrench needing calibrating but I'm guessing it does.

Thanks
 

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Your best bet is to get a variety of different sized ones. There are some areas where you have full and total access to the bolt and others where you're going to have to move into a funky position to get to the bolt. A good set of flex head ratcheting wrenches is a good investment, but those aren't likely to allow you to set the torque.
 

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Good advice. I was directed to a website that sold the electronic torque wrench I was interested in. It happen to be a calibration company in Sanford Florida just north of me here in Orlando. I called the company and talked with a technician that said he would not have a problem in selling me the wrench I was interested in but he asked me what exactly I was needing it for. Well to make a long story short he suggest the same thing. Several different wrenches. He said to stop by and he would show me the types he would suggest. This company being in the buisness of calibrating many makes & types of torque wrenches for the areospace field seems a good place to go visit. He said he had some less costly wrenches that if taken care of would not need to be recalibrated for years and if needed could make the calibrations right there in their shop. I'm going to see him next week and will let you know what I find out.
 
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