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1995 VT1100C2
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The stock VT750 engine on the dyno makes peak torque from 2100 to 3200 rpm, the torque curve starts and climbs almost straight up at 2000 rpm.
At 2000 rpm the rather torquey engine is making 8 horsepower.

View attachment 288355
Peak torque is around 3000 but adequate (90%) torque of 40lb.ft is reached around 2100 rpm. Remember in any gear peak torque = maximum acceleration. However you must change gears and the rpms will drop. Based on my gear ratio and staying within good torque range, my shift range is about 2200 rpm.

So if the gear ratio on your bike suggests 12 mph is somewhere around 2000 that's not a bad shift point for cruising. My 2nd and 3rd gears are really close ratio so I tend to go through them in a few seconds and end up in 4th in the city and 5th by the time I have gone halfway up a highway on ramp.

Racing light to light or on a track, you would be quicker shifting at 4500 WOT the whole way but that's a different story.
 

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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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Peak torque at the wheel = maximum acceleration.
Peak power with the right gear gives you that.

It is all somewhat irrelevant the way most Shadows are tuned.

We can all ride our bikes as we like and that is the true measure of flexibility. (-:
 

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2007 VT750DC Spirit “chopper”
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Hey some of those scooters are fast I tell you. (-;
You’re not kiddin! A Suzuki Burgman 650 will give any Shadow 750 a run, they’re stout! Surprised the hell out of me.
 
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1999 Shadow 750 ACE VT750CD3 Modified
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You’re not kiddin! A Suzuki Burgman 650 will give any Shadow 750 a run, they’re stout! Surprised the hell out of me.
Holy cow! I knew they were solid performers.
I've seen them used on the freeway.
Looking at the performance data it almost looks Suzuki set the VT750 as the performance target.
I thought my 750 ACE was a pretty good sleeper, but a Burgman that's positively Rip Van Winkle.
 

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I'm on a Honda Shadow VLX 600 4 speed. My buddy has a bigger bike and he locked his tire up shifting down while going too fast. Now I'm worrying MYSELF! I'm a very new rider and so is he and I have a big worry that if I down shift wrong I'll lock my tire and crash. What are the chances of this happening on this bike? I don't mean going 55 and then shifting down to 2nd without slowing down. I'm talking if I'm doing 40-45 and I shift to second and I don't slow down enough will I lock the tire, how forgiving is this bike for dumb newbie mistakes? I appreciate the input and the hopeful cure for this anxiety I've incurred!
Swifty2014 nailed it, just let the clutch real slow. And if you were going too fast, you would hear the motor rev to high before the tire locked. But I can tell your someone who thinks before you act ,so just be thoughtful like your doing. You'll be fine don't worry
 

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Swifty2014 nailed it, just let the clutch real slow. And if you were going too fast, you would hear the motor rev to high before the tire locked. But I can tell your someone who thinks before you act ,so just be thoughtful like your doing. You'll be fine don't worry
I disagree. The OP is discussing shifting to 2nd gear at 45 mp and that is simply dangerous. Letting out the clutch slowly is not what Swifty recommended and in fact he recommends not using clutch so slow at that speed. Using brakes to slow is correct and you should not need to hear the motor rev to know you are making a mistake.
 

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I'm not saying it's safe (not by a long shot), but I have to get from 55 to crawl to get in my driveway. "Naughty word", my Aero is a beast when it comes to slowing down suddenly. I'll take anything I can get. Sometimes it chirps, most times not, but I know exactly how it's going to react. (Yes, I'm matching my revs.) Also helps that I got used to engine braking driving high performance cars. And yes, I replaced many a clutch in my youth.
Noobies: Don't do it. Engine braking takes years to learn and can get out of control real fast.
As for Honda's recommend shift points: Are they kidding? 30 is somewhere between 2nd and 3rd on the Aero. I think it would stall if I tried 4th. And forget 5th.
 

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The stock VT750 engine on the dyno makes peak torque from 2100 to 3200 rpm, the torque curve starts and climbs almost straight up at 2000 rpm.
At 2000 rpm the rather torquey engine is making 8 horsepower.

View attachment 288355

So in this case you have a 550lb bike plus the rider weight that just manages to make 8 horsepower.
I thought I would post this interesting dyno chart and yes it is for a motorcycle. Maximum torque at under 1,000 rpms. Any guesses which one?


dyno2.jpg
 

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I'm on a Honda Shadow VLX 600 4 speed. My buddy has a bigger bike and he locked his tire up shifting down while going too fast. Now I'm worrying MYSELF! I'm a very new rider and so is he and I have a big worry that if I down shift wrong I'll lock my tire and crash. What are the chances of this happening on this bike? I don't mean going 55 and then shifting down to 2nd without slowing down. I'm talking if I'm doing 40-45 and I shift to second and I don't slow down enough will I lock the tire, how forgiving is this bike for dumb newbie mistakes? I appreciate the input and the hopeful cure for this anxiety I've incurred!
This is a common problem with all drivers, especially new ones. The rear wheel suddenly looses traction when you down shift and let the clutch out too fast without proper throttle control. The wheel doesn’t “lock-up”, just a sudden slip that could easily make you loose control. Newer scooters have devices on the clutch that assist in this phenomenon by slipping the clutch automatically. Just goose the throttle alittle as you engage the clutch helps emensly! Good luck, ride safe!
 

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This is a common problem with all drivers, especially new ones. The rear wheel suddenly looses traction when you down shift and let the clutch out too fast without proper throttle control. The wheel doesn’t “lock-up”, just a sudden slip that could easily make you loose control. Newer scooters have devices on the clutch that assist in this phenomenon by slipping the clutch automatically. Just goose the throttle alittle as you engage the clutch helps emensly! Good luck, ride safe!
Good point, although it's been mentioned before in this very thread:
:)
 

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Well there are two types involved with this.

One is the guy who is clueless just dropping gears to fast as he can most likely not using his front brake much if at all.

Then there is guy number two who is riding very fast and needs to slow down very fast. You don't really want the back wheel to lock up or skid but it is very controllable. I went into a corner a month or two ago and the back wheel went loose on me. I was trail braking hard into a corner dropping maybe 50 MPH and I needed to slow down fast. My weight was on the front end since I was heading into a corner with a lot of front brake. That lightens up the back end as weight shifts to the front wheel. I was also rev matching into the corner but I didn't get that right apparently. Back wheel skidded a little but it wasn't a problem for me. What I did is not for a new rider. I was trying to go sport bike on a cruiser and those bikes are not the same.

You should worry about locking up the back wheel? No, if you are using your front brake as the primary brake. If you use the back brake as your primary brake yes you should worry.

Look up some braking video's along with rev matching and trail braking. Watch those and you will have much more info. The front brake is your primary brake and it all has to do with weight shift on your bike. The back brake is for slow speed stuff and rolling in nicely to stops.
 

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...
You should worry about locking up the back wheel? No, if you are using your front brake as the primary brake. If you use the back brake as your primary brake yes you should worry....
The OP is discussing downshifting to 2nd gear at 45 mph without braking and in that case I would worry about rear wheel lock.
 

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I thought I would post this interesting dyno chart and yes it is for a motorcycle. Maximum torque at under 1,000 rpms. Any guesses which one?


View attachment 288457
That’s the 2018 Goldwing Dyno that Cycleworld did. I never forget a graph.
 
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That’s the 2018 Goldwing Dyno that Cycleworld did. I never forget a graph.
Wow. I had a good memory but its gone. I spent days looking for my rain pants and couldn't find them anywhere in the house so finally ordered new Frogg Toggs. Then, as I was pulling out my 12V compressor to help a BMW rider with a flat, guess what I found.

Correct on the graph. Its an amazing engine if you like multi cylinders. This is why Honda kicks the crap out of the Harley Rushmore project bikes or BMW touring bikes that develop more hp but would you rather be at 4000 rpm or 2300 rpm to get 100 ft lb torque?


1593326699223.png
 

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While the memory for that stuff is good it’s sort of a forced memory, for years it was a job to look at many dyno graphs and data logs and build maps based on values, I just have an eye for curves.

Call me crazy but new for new, I’d have to take the BMW K1600 Over the New 1800 Goldwing. I like revs 😬

288492


BMW is $4k less too, new vs new.

Edit: If you want a hilarious torque curve, look at a dyno for the 2020 Indian Chieftan, or any 2017+ FLHX over 114”, They make over 95lb/ft at 1250rpm and 130lb/ft by 2500rpm, in a simple two-cylinder air-cooled pushrod V-twin.

You can go sick here looking at these - Dyno Charts - Fuel Moto University
 

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... I like revs 😬...
Yep if you like higher rpm the BMW is a great bike.

But unless my eyes deceive me, it appears both those Honda red colored lines, torque and horsepower, are above the BMW blue ones all the way to 4000 RPM !

I don't read a lot of Dyno charts but doesn't that imply the Goldwing out torques the BMW, can shift at 3000 RPM, dropping down to 2200rpm, out torques the BMW again, repeat all the way to 6th gear. Based on the Goldwing gearing, at 4000 rpm in 6th gear you are travelling 116 mph. (58 mph at 2000 RPM)
 
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