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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2004 Shadow Aero.
During the colder winter months I don't do any of the "long storage" preparations.
Is there any harm to the engine, etc, in starting the bike every week and letting it idle unitl it would be at operating temperature?
I have gotten different answers from several sources.
 

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davb90 said:
I have a 2004 Shadow Aero.
During the colder winter months I don't do any of the "long storage" preparations.
Is there any harm to the engine, etc, in starting the bike every week and letting it idle unitl it would be at operating temperature?
I have gotten different answers from several sources.
It isn't a good practise but it won't hurt the bike too much. Make sure you open the garage door (a couple of inches will do) to let out the fumes. And don't let it idle too long. You really only need to let it run 5 to run fresh gas into the carbs.

Remember though, the battery will not be charging at idle. It take about 1500-2000 rpms to charge the battery.

Now...go make some noise.

Joe
 

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Running a bike at idle or even just above in cold weather will not get the pipes warm enough to burn the moisture out of the pipes and mufflers. You can likely expect them to rust out prematurely.

I used to run my '83 Nighthawk like that. It only took two years of doing that to rust the mufflers clean thru.
 

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i think biggest thing is mositure that is not able to be dried up after starting in cold in winter..

my neighbor started his goldwing in winter, every month..his brakes would not work..the honda mechanic told him starting bike in winter caused mositure to develop , i think in brake lines ..

he told him not to start bike in winter,he still does because it worked for him for 40 years..

i change my oil before winter storage, fill tank with gas and stabil,so far, everything is ok each spring..
 

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commanche said:
i think biggest thing is mositure that is not able to be dried up after starting in cold in winter..

my neighbor started his goldwing in winter, every month..his brakes would not work..the honda mechanic told him starting bike in winter caused mositure to develop , i think in brake lines ..

he told him not to start bike in winter,he still does because it worked for him for 40 years..

i change my oil before winter storage, fill tank with gas and stabil,so far, everything is ok each spring..
I've been doing what you've been doing for the past 30 or years too....and never a problem. I change the oil, fill the tank with gas and stabil, pump up the tires with an extra 10 lbs of air, plug up the exhause pipes, cover it with a sheet, connect the "battery tender" to it.....and forget about it. It stays in an unheated garage that way until spring....never touch it or start it, and I have never had any problems.
 

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Same here. Just do a little prep before the winter, and forget about it until Spring. The moisture will not only rust your pipes from the inside out, but it will also not allow the moisture to escape from the oil. Burning gasoline produces water, and some of it ends up in your oil. Riding the bike for a while helps this water to boil out of the oil, and all is well again. If the water can't get out of the oil, it produces acids in the oil, which can corrode your engine from the inside out. It's far better for the bike as a while to just let it sit for the winter months. Just do like the other above have said and put your battery on the tender (Take it inside. The cold will shorten the life of your battery.) over-inflate the tires a little, run some fuel stabilizer through, and your bike will be ready when you are in the spring.

--Justin
 

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tubes_rock said:
Same here. Just do a little prep before the winter, and forget about it until Spring. The moisture will not only rust your pipes from the inside out, but it will also not allow the moisture to escape from the oil. Burning gasoline produces water, and some of it ends up in your oil. Riding the bike for a while helps this water to boil out of the oil, and all is well again. If the water can't get out of the oil, it produces acids in the oil, which can corrode your engine from the inside out. It's far better for the bike as a while to just let it sit for the winter months. Just do like the other above have said and put your battery on the tender (Take it inside. The cold will shorten the life of your battery.) over-inflate the tires a little, run some fuel stabilizer through, and your bike will be ready when you are in the spring.

--Justin
Burning gasoline does not produce water.

Moisture is in the crankcase because it's in the air.
Due to the temperature changes outside the crankcase, moisture
condenses on the inside of the crankcase and the pipes..

This is why, if you do start the bike, you want to bring it up to
full operating temperature... to burn off that moisture.

It's the same effect as taking a coke can out of the fridge.
As soon as the can is removed from the fridge,
heat from the ambient air by nature moves to the cold can and
the moisture in the air condenses on the can.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks - Winter "Storage"

Just a quick note to thank you all for the helpful information. This was the first time I posted a question - the response was great! Thanks to everyone/ :D
 

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litnin said:
Burning gasoline does not produce water.
It may be knitpicking, but the burning/oxidation/combustion of any hydrocarbon DOES produce varying amounts of H2O and CO2.

In fact, in an perfect reaction (proper ratios of fuel:air plus ideal conditions) the only byproducts of burning a hydrocarbon in oxygen are water and carbon dioxide.

For example: CH4 + 2[O²] ---> CO² + 2[H²O]

Gasoline, a complex hydrocarbon, produces many other byproducts in addition to water and carbon dioxide, but there is no doubt water is a byproduct, even if the air used in the combustion is bone-dry.

It's basic chemistry.

-K
 

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Right on, K! I knew I remembered my chemistry right! It's the cold engine that causes this water (in the form of water vapor after combustion) to condense on cold engine parts and end up in the crankcase, exhaust pipes, etc.

--Justin
 

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Kframe said:
For example: CH4 + 2[O²] ---> CO² + 2[H²O]
I love it! I'm showing this to my teenager to remind him that many things he's learning in high school WILL have practical uses in the future. He's real good at math and sciences; thanks for giving him an illustration that we can put to use with our bikes.

That aside, thanks all for the winter tips. Our bikes haven't been out of the shed in a month. I don't have a battery tender, and I was wondering how long before the fuel starts to degrade: whether to drain it from the tank/lines, or if Stabil is safe. Central Virginia winters are not all that bad, but it's been bitter cold most days lately. Ice is coming today, but I would love to get them out and ride them around later in the week if the temps remain above freezing. Your tips on not just idling them are helpful. If I'm going to start them (for the sake of the battery and moisture), then I'm going to ride them around awhile to dry them out and give them a good charge. :)
 

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lol, the only thing I learned in chem was how to make my home made gunpowder better! :lol:

Can't do that nowdays, get yourself labeled a terrorist. :(

8)
 

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Little Honda took a drink but he shall drink no more for what he thought was H2O was H2SO4. (H2SO4=sulfuric acid)

That's all I ever remembered from science class. :lol:
 

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I love this forum! What a great group of folks! Anyway, a battery tender is not required, but I like to have one, and just hook it up twice a winter or so. The biggest thing I've found is that not exposing the battery to freezing temperatures over the course of the winter will save your battery. I take mine out and store it under the kitchen sink (cool and dry under there) for the winter.

Stabil will help too. Biggest thing is that you add the stabil on your last fill-up at the end of the season, and ride it home. The tank will be full which will keep the inside from rusting due to condensation (like litnin said) and the ride home will help the Stabil get circulated through the fuel lines, pump and carbs. From there, you'll be all set to re-install the battery and fire it back up in the Spring!

--Justin
 

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thunderglass said:
Little Honda took a drink but he shall drink no more for what he thought was H2O was H2SO4. (H2SO4=sulfuric acid)

That's all I ever remembered from science class. :lol:
LOL!
I remember that too!

I also remember the time our chem teacher had a beaker of a solution he called dihydrogen-oxide and that it was essentially equal parts of lye and hydrochloric acid, and asked if anyone dared to take a sip.

"What, is he crazy?!?", we thought.

Nobody dared, so he chugged the whole cup!
We, half hoping, expected that he was about to burn his insides out.

We were a bit disappointed when he next asked if anyone else would like a nice glass of salt water.
:roll:

(NaOH + HCl ---> H2O + NaCl)

See, science is fun!
-K
 
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